Hush Review

The opening act of Hush is one to be studied. Everything that assumes importance in the second and third act are made acquaintance with the viewer in the first act itself without focusing on any of it. The dread that grips us seems so distant, yet when it does, it hits us with the pace of a peregrine falcon. Hush is the kind of thrillers which do not get made nowadays, it uses silence to create the feeling of utmost dread.

Kate Siegel gives a visceral performance as Maddie. It was so convincing that I actually thought she was mute and deaf. To see her transform from a scared soul to the ravage she transforms into towards the end is chilling. John Gallagher, who I have admired since his act as Jim in The Newsroom, sheds his charm and transforms brilliantly into a psychopath.

The editing is spell-binding, keeping us transfixed on the screen throughout the run time. I love the sharp-focus shots, and the rapid editing makes the pace quicken.

The only problem that I did have with this movie is the third act which seems sagging, and weak in terms of the first and second act. But it seems like a minor hindrance. I watched Hush with a good turnout of audience. And believe me, they were very interested.

RATING :- 9 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sing Street Review

All the real-critics, I mean the ones that actually have the privilege of going to paid screenings and review every movie that hits the theatres wait for a movie that blows them away throughout the year. This movie is found seldom, after sitting through an inconceivable amount of shite. But, it’s that feeling one has after watch a truly great movie, that incommunicable mix of emotions that keeps them going. I, on the other hand, watch only classics on my computer, which you might think is better because I can afford the luxury of steering clear from all the bad movies (and the reason why there are so many positive reviews on my blog). However, I differ on this issue. As my day is filled with watching only classics, that feeling of blown away becomes more limited to me for I am impressed by almost all the movies. That is why Sing Street is special to me. I don’t often get to use this phrase, and to be honest, due to much fault of mine for I am pretty miserly in that respect, I can truly say, I was blown away after watching Sing Street.

Conor Lawlor is a teenager struck in the middle of poverty-stricken Ireland and the new age of music videos. He has a crush on an aspiring model, and wants to get her number. He puts the pretence that it is contact her for a music video of the band he is a part of. Works very well for him, to be honest. However, he now realises there is one daunting task before him, to put a band.

Many a times I have felt art is in a state of oneness, for when two or more of them converge, it only helps in enhancing the experience. When music meets cinema, it is pure magic and who better to capture that magic effortlessly than the Quentin Tarantino of the musical genre, John Carney. Carney weaved magic with his movies, Once and Begin Again which are very dear to me, and as is their music. The problem with most musicals is that the music itself is abominable. All who have watched Carney’s movies will admit that regardless of whether they liked the movie or not (which they did), they will end up buying the soundtrack. Sing Street has beautiful songs, which I am pretty sure I will be humming to for the years to come.

Teenage innocence and music beautifully coalesce to form an act veering towards redemption in Sing Street. Carney creates winsome characters here, and we genuinely care about their lives and aspirations. Sing Street is at its heart, an underdog story but considering the aggregate amount of those stories Hollywood has churned out to market on our feelings, it is a bonzer of a feeling to have a genuine one. The characters here seem to be genuinely passionate about their dreams, and why not, it is their only shot at redemption. There is a maximally beautiful sequence where Cosmo and Raphina are travelling on a ferry and a boat to England passes by them, with people waving at them. It adds nothing to the narrative, but is the fleeting images of the dreams and ambitions of the characters floating by them, so close yet so distant. It is visual poetry.

Sing Street is an orgasm to the ears. Rarely do you get a soundtrack which paints the entire plot of the movie and roars with the ardour of its characters. That is what Sing Street is about, and I guess what will make it so relatable to each individual who watches it, it is about a bunch of characters who just want to be heard.

RATING : 9.5 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

Dangal Review

Cinema is subjective. Various research has been done so as to analyze this strange phenomenon where a person hates a movie which thousands may love. Recently, I read that an impressing beginning creates a positive vibe about the movie in one-fourth of the audiences. In that case I am really happy for Dangal. No starting sequence has set the tone of what is about to follow as aptly as Dangal since, I even dare to say this, that horrifying Normandy sequence in Saving Private Ryan which encapsulated the entire feeling of dread which was to follow.

Dangal is about Mahavir Phogat who trains his daughters, Babita and Geeta, to become world class wrestlers, so as to win a gold medal for their nation.

Whenever Indian cinema is pitted against world cinema, I SHIVER. It is like Real Madrid playing with Barcelona (have fun figuring out which one I insulted). Well, here is another weapon to my arsenal. One of the few things that I have noticed through my acquaintance with Indian cinema, and I take immense pride in this, we make some pretty badass sports movies. Lagaan, Mary Kom, Iqbal, Bhaag Milkha Bhaag and so many names. And this one again capture the essence of sports.

The focus is on the technicality. The matches are not of importance here, what matters is how a champion is molded and with a 160 minute run time, there is ample space for character development which is brilliantly utilized. I know I might have quashed any interest you may have had to watch this movie with the 160-minute run time bomb, but believe me, there won’t be a single moment where you will look down in your watch and go ‘Crap, Emma Watson was hosting SNL tonight. What the hell I am doing here ?’ And believe me, when I say it is Emma Watson-missable good, I mean business !

Aamir Khan is…… Every frame, that he is in, should be studied by those who aspire to become actors. This is how you act. Secret is, you don’t act, you become the character. Here is a character that has so many complex layers. You can interpret him as a Good Samaritan, a true patriot, or even a complete jerk and yet you wouldn’t be able to not admire him. This kind of performances are like those dreams we pray to have. That brief five second scene where he acknowledges the audience after his victory in the nationals itself brought me to tears. The rest of the cast is phenomenal. Fatima Sana Sheikh is at par with Khan in her performance. This paring emulates the same warmth Clint Eastwood- Hilary Swank duo did in Million Dollar Baby.

Sethu Sriram’s cinematography makes ample use of the effects used by John Seale in Mad Max : Fury Road with the characters’ marching giving an hallucinatory and in-the-moment kind of effect. And the best thing, no shaky cams ! It is a stupid style of cinematography (except when utilized by Paul Greengrass) which vandalizes the efforts of the action choreographer because the audience cannot get a freaking thing and it is sort of an insult to the actors themselves who have put in their all in perfecting the sport. His cinematography makes the very nervousness of the sport palpable on the screen. The background score is heart-wrenching.

If we talk about faults, the only one I could find was that the spotlight was to a major portion on Geeta Phogat which made me feel kinda missing out on the career of her equally illustrious sister Babita. Here exploits in this discipline are only focused upon in a very short period of time, as compared to the screen time her sister’s exploits enjoy.

However, that doesn’t take shine from this stupendous masterpiece in the sports genre which should be watched as soon as possible. My love for India enhanced quadruple times after watching Dangal. Not just because of the patriotic content, but because of the heights this film has reached Indian cinema to.

P.S. This film has been cited by some as example of patriarchy rather than woman empowerment which it is about because Mahavir made them wrestlers, by going against their initial negative stance on wrestling on this, I cite a quote from Breaking Bad, which although was said in a different context, summarized aptly my feeling about this issue ‘And a man, a man provides. And he does it even when he’s not appreciated, or respected, or even loved. He simply bears up and he does it. Because he’s a man.’

RATING : 9.5 / 10

IF YOU HAVE WATCHED THIS MOVIE, WHAT DID YOU THINK ABOUT IT ? DO LET ME KNOW IN COMMENTS BELOW. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/pages/Demanded-Critical-Reviews/1565666967024477?ref=hl YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

 

 

Natsamrat Review

The words uttered by Ganpatrao in Natsamrat feels like a religious discourse, falling on ears like a soothing balm. It is after many a long years that dialogues with such finesse have been put up on the screen. They seem nothing less than those featured in plays Ganpatrao cherishes and brings to life on stage. Screenplay writers nowadays dumb down their content in a disquietude that the audience will not comprehend the gems of emotions they hide beneath the curtains called words. Here, the writing is intelligent treating the audience with the reverence it is often penurious of.

A forlorn Ganpatrao asks in an address to the characters he religiously brought into life ‘When will my grief be considered worthy as yours?’ Nana Patekar rises to this very question and breathes fire into this character. There are rare times when an actor just draws you into a movie, when he rises above the movie itself and well, puts you in a state of limbo where you are divested from your physical abilities to move. You just stare and get amazed. I hate to say it because I believe staunchly that every actor has untapped potential beyond realization, but this is a career-defining performance by Nana. He can’t rise above this unfortunately and it is an amalgamation of sadness and joy when I come to this realization.

As to the movie itself, it is left miles behind in the inter space between it and Patekar’s performance. It is ridden with the very cliches I had expected it to be free from the shackles of. The premise, although bases on a play by V.V.Shirwadkar, brings back memories of a much-superior Tokyo Story(or a much inferior Baghban as well), which forever immortalized the theme of the neglectful children-old parents through the mastery of the profound Ozu himself .

While being a compelling character-study, Natsamrat is lagging behind on adapting itself to the familiarity of its concept to the audience. But, with Nana Patekar’s visceral performance the movie is aeons ahead of what it could have been without him. It is Manjrekar’s ode to the purity and greatness of theater and its dialogues which remain forever etched in the minds of the audience, and peering through that field of vision, it is a beautiful and heartfelt ode, a one which should be watched at least once. Patekar’s performance embodies every emotion that actors strive to put up on screen through courses of their lifetimes, which in most cases unfortunately, bears not even a dint of success.

RATING : 8 / 10

IF YOU HAVE WATCHED THIS MOVIE, WHAT DID YOU THINK ABOUT IT ? DO LET ME KNOW IN COMMENTS BELOW. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/pages/Demanded-Critical-Reviews/1565666967024477?ref=hl YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.