Cinema Paradiso Review

Every one of us has a favourite dish at home. It is utter joy when your mother makes it, and although you know that there are thousands of restaurants out there which serve the same dish with better taste and finesse, you still proclaim it in an unabated manner that no one can make it better than her. Logically, you are lying but emotionally, you are not. For it has that one intangible ingredient which at the end of the day seems to make all the difference – love.

I believe it is the same element which has resulted in Giuseppe Tornatore’s Cinema Paradiso to carve out a niche for itself in cinematic history. It is that rare work of art which is an appreciation of the art itself. The tale is of Salvatore, a film-maker who reminisces about his upbringing in a small town in Sicily, where he forged his love for cinema through Alfredo, the projectionist of the cinema hall of the town.

Although centered around cinema, it works as Fellini’s Amarcot does, for it seems more concerned with examining the lives of the people centered around the main action rather than the action itself. With this Tornatore ushers in a wide variety of characters whose entire courses of life can be summarized within their cinema-going experiences. From first glances to romances to sexual encounters, Cinema Paradiso which is the cinema hall in question holds the memories of the lives of an entire generation within its walls.

There is a scene where Alfredo projects The Firemen of Viggiu on the walls of a nearby house. As the projection moves from the walls of the projection room to the hearts of cinema lovers, I reckon every true cinephile shed tears, being reminded of why they fell in love with this art form in the first place.

Cinema Paradiso is melodramatic at some places and at times, seems to usher in forced emotions with lagging scenes. But for all its heart, it stands out as an imperfect masterpiece. It maybe because Tornatore made this work with the complete realization that a 155 minute movie about the love of movies would be an exercise in futility. Instead he makes it about the only thing every cinephile world over loves more than cinema, and what every work of cinema is a celebration of  -Life Itself.

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The Wizard Of Oz Reviewed & Analyzed

The fact that a MGM musical is still celebrated by cinema lovers world over is an astonishing certitude. But after watching The Wizard Of Oz, I laugh in the face of the qualms I had regarding this movie before watching it. There isn’t a movie worthy enough of its position in world cinema than this adaptation of the Frank Baum classic by Victor Fleming.

I won’t get myself in the trouble of trying to explain its plot for the moment, for it’s as famous as the movie itself and so silly yet genius that I haven’t yet developed such a mastery of English language that it can be summarized by me within a paragraph.

The movie is a celebration of everything that we love about fantasies – characters reeking of innocence in a world which doesn’t. But rather than praising its beautiful and hilarious songs, the wonderful production design or the fabulous performances, I would much like to dedicate this post to why this MGM musical of 1939 still holds its ground in a world so strongly inhibited by the likes of Kubrick and Hitchcock and everyone else. And the only reason which seems to transpires before me except for the historical importance it reeks of for the use of Technicolor is the plot of the movie.

So, the movie’s central protagonist is Dorothy Gale who as you might know, unless you have been living under a rock for the entire course of your lifetime, gets transported by a cyclone to the land of Oz where she meets the Scarecrow (one who wishes for a brain), Tin Man (one who wishes for a heart) and the Cowardly Lion (one who wishes for courage). Together, they embark on the journey to Crystal Palace, to meet Oz who will fulfil all their desires. (A paragraph which seems to contradict my earlier statement about summarizing the plot of this movie in a paragraph, but believe me, reading this and thinking you now know the entirety of the plot of this movie would be to look at one brick of the Great Wall Of China and say that’s all there is to it)

The Scarecrow, Tin Man and Lion for me seem to epitome the innermost desires of Dorothy’s which seems to give the entire movie a surreal underlining which I will go into later. The Scarecrow seems to be a metaphorical representation of Dorothy’s yearning, or more better a child’s yearning, to be considered equal in his/her intelligence by the adults. In the beginning one can see how Dorothy’s family members seem to dispose of her troubles without giving it a moment’s thought, most probably giving her the idea that they consider her asinine, and thus the yearning to be intelligent.

The origin of Cowardly Lion can be traced back to when Zeke advises Dorothy to be a little brave while facing Almira Gulch. Dorothy’s reluctance to accept her consternation about Gulch seems to be the reason why the Cowardly Lion seems so unabating in making his cowardly nature so obtrusive.

Then what about the Tin Man who wishes for a heart to feel with, a quality which Dorothy seems so abound of ? I believe this is her yearning for Miss Almira Gulch, which further affirms her goodness.  Although the Wicked Witch of the West seems to be a representation of Gulch I believe it is restricted here to only her physicality and her hate for Toto. Tin Man here possesses the same yearning which Dorothy wishes came true for Gulch as well, thus making him a projection of the Gulch Dorothy wants her to be.

And about Oz itself ? It seems much to be a work of Dorothy’s subconscious rather than a parallel reality. The fact that the passage of time in the dream world is much faster than compared to the real world also explains the length of the journey as well. It seems Dorothy’s subconscious creates a world of imagination, inhibits it with characters which are reflections of her own self and introspect about her existence.

Or is this reading too much into nothing ? Is my chain of thought reminiscent of the way the adults in the movie reject the notion of Oz at the end of the movie ?

Whatever it may be, the creation of a child’s innocent subconscious or an unimaginable reality, The Wizard Of Oz is one of the most delightful movies to have ever come out and had me from that moment where Aunt Em says to Almira that ‘Miss Gulch, I now know exactly what I think about you, but I can’t say it because I am a Catholic’.

RATING :- 9.4 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes

M Review

 
Fritz Lang’s M works on two levels :- one as a police procedural and the second as a social criticism. It invites an open discussion on the plea of insanity regarding sexual abuse cases without maintaining a favorable position regarding each argument.
 
One of the main factors why M turns out to be such a stupendous final product is the fact that this film is devoid of any suspense. The actions of its characters are more mechanical in sense than thrilling.
 
Fritz Lang attempts to penetrate into the human mentality when provoked by uncertainty and dread. Lang weaves the structure of the movie as a social commentatory of the state of the society during Nazi Germany.
 
The gangsters in the movie are reminiscent of the wiseguys in The Godfather, for they wish to distance themselves from a crime so heinous in nature. Their attitude reflects that of the society which seems to find a justification for all the other criminals, but reserve rebuke for the ones tangled in abuse cases. However, Lang also provides a counter-argument to this case, not much with words, but with images. The scene where M tries to abduct another girl is heartbreaking in its nature, making my mind mimeograph the exact emotions the parents of the child might have felt when they found their child’s raped bodies.
 
Fritz Lang’s M is a rare movie, for it invites its viewers to actually think about the grave issues it presents rather than spoon feed the audience what they actually want to hear.
RATING :- 9 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes

Stalker Review

I was recently watching one of THR’s Roundtables in which the host, Stephen Gallaway posed a very interesting question. He asked ‘If you had the chance of preserving one movie before the apocalypse, which would it be?’ I am affirmative that I would reply Andrei Tarvosky’s Stalker. It is a fantasy movie made for the people who hate fantasy movies.

One of the very few job requirements a film critic is supposed to have by default is an ebullient attitude towards movies with slow-pacing, and most of the times, it rules me out. Stalker begins on a sombre note with snail-aced long takes. But for some reason, the atmosphere of Stalker with its enigmatic music and color composition had me already spell-binded. Later, I read that I wasn’t the only one one had encountered with this quandary. Many suggested had suggested to Tarvosky that the movie should be more dynamic in nature, to which he replied ‘The film needs to be slower and duller at the start so that the viewers who walked into the wrong theatre have time to leave before the main action starts.’

But once he overcomes that starting hiccup, Tarvosky rewards his viewer with an unforgettable spectacle of visual poetry set into motion. The plot is centered around a Stalker who leads a professor and a writer through The Zone, a mysterious restricted piece of land which holds a room which is said to fulfill the innermost desires of any man who enters it. The structure of this so-called Zone deserves a movie of its own, for the roots of its existence are ground so deep in the waters of surrealism that it would put Salvador Dali to shame.

The movie more than often reminded me of Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now which couldn’t care less about the journey which its characters undertake. Instead, it works as an anatomy of the innermost desires of its characters, revealing to us their cherished beliefs and their exploration of the meaning of life. The movie is filled to the brim with intriguing philosophical conversations which seem to give equal importance to both ends of the spectrum, acting as a catharsis for these characters, all of whom seem to be leading extremely wretched lives.

The movie questions the very nature of the existence of such a Zone and its usefulness. It forces us to introspect and delve deep within ourselves and examine our very own innermost desires. In my personal experience, it resulted in a startling revelation of what I considered myself to be and what I am as a person.

Stalker is an enigmatic and surprisingly moving motion picture which will forever remain one of cinema’s most treasured gems. They don’t make them like this anymore.

RATING :- 9.5 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Come & See Review

I was scared of myself while watching Come & See. The characters in the movie look straight into the camera, with gazes and faces which will penetrate anyone’s heart, and run, amok with fear, as if the viewer himself is a devil they have come face to face with. It creates a ghastly atmosphere for the events set to unfold, which are an exploration into the evil which resides within all of us.

Almost all war movies maintain a zeal for self-censorship with respect to the audience. Come & See however keeps hold of its colossal power on its audience through the brutal violence it showcases, turning my living room into a battlefield in itself. It didn’t have shots fired all around it, but I could sense my living room being filled with all the emotions of the characters of Come & See, and to needlessly clarify, none of them are anything close to pleasant. The movie works as dissection of the human conditions during the World War II and all its despicable violence. It seems to encompass all of life itself, even paving a way for a lust-driven, yet heartfelt romance which we root for.

Albus Dumbeldore once said ‘Do not pity the dead, Harry. Pity the living and above all, those who live without love.’ There is a scene in this movie where hundreds of villagers are burnt alive in a woodshed. Their screams of anguish create immeasurable dread further accentuated by the laughs of the Nazis. Tears welled up in eyes not for the victims, but for the survivors. How can one ever witness such inhumanity and not lose faith in life ? Klimov begs us to feel sorry, not for the dead, but for the living who die with every passing second of their lives due to the indelible scars the violence which materialized has left on their minds. The ones who will be plagued the rest of their lives with nightmares of their dear and near ones getting burnt to death. The ones who will have to live their rest of their lives trying to forget those cries of anguish.

Come & See isn’t without its own share of faults. It is not devoid of melodrama at times, and in the end, a patriotic streak towards Russia. However, none of these flaws seem have any effect on the final turnout. That maybe because unlike other movies which act like puppies wanting to be petted by everyone, Come & See actually takes a stance. Fearlessly it proclaims what it actually thinks about the SS soldiers – Satan in a uniform.

RATING :- 9.3 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

La La Land Review

La La Land is a love-drenched tale. It comes as a relief in the midst of all the so-called romantic movies nowadays where the protagonists seem to only want to get into each other’s pants and where love comes off as a secondary perk. But, La La Land’s charm exudes from its playful innocence. It does seem Mia and Sebastian are actually in love, and believe me, that’s a change.

Although I put on the pretence that I welcome movies of ever genre with open hands, I do not. Musical genre is one of those unfortunates. The main reason is that the music itself is crummy. La La Land is tailor made for romantics like me. It is embellished with melodies which make you croon in love. Take the song where Mia and Sebastian sing about how the beautiful and romantic view of Los Angeles is a waste. I was laughing at the rate of a chuckle per lyric.

Ryan Gosling (I have a man-crush on him) is brilliant here. He and Stone are like Bogart-Bergman of the new age and their chemistry is beyond words. It is a joy to see them together on screen. Emma is fabulous as Mia, on the eyes and the mind, and is well-deserving of her Oscar.

The thing about La La Land is that however silly it might seem, and it does at parts, it is impossible not to like it. I agree this is not a masterpiece, but it did make me cry, did make me want to fall in love, did make me want to croon with my crush in the presence of only stars with its melodious tunes playing the background. But these are all broken dreams, and La La Land seems sympathetic towards them and in a way, towards me. I love movies which understand and acknowledge the pains of a broken heart, and treat it with the respect it deserves. La La Land does that.

The problem with life is that there is no background music. La La Land is the perfect fix to that.

RATING :- 8 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

Million Dollar Baby Review

Million Dollar is two movies emulsified into one, one is a sports movie and the other is a drama. Many movies have attempted this transition and failed miserably, but the skillful hands of Clint Eastwood never errs. As I am writing about this movie, I should warn you my dear friend, that if I spoil any of this movie for you, I ask for your apology beforehand. You see, I won’t get a sound sleep if I do a half-assed job at describing one of the greatest movies I have ever seen in my life. So, my apologies.

Million Dollar Baby dives head-first into a world of cliches with its familiar settings. You have the obsessed natural fighter, the gruff old trainer who is at loss after a betrayal and the likeable nobody. However, Paul Haggis’ screenplay circumscribes you from being skeptical about it from the first dialogue. Morgan Freeman’s rusty and soothing voice belts out some of the finest, if not THE finest dialogues written for any sports movie. It paints a picture from just plain words.

As the movie progresses, it takes you with it, completely enchanted. There, I found myself, cheering for Maggie with all my heart, with love I couldn’t even muster for my best friends when they competed in those inter-school football matches. I rarely root for a protagonist, but when I do, I do it with all my heart. In Million Dollar Baby, there was a brief moment where I felt to pay for an injury Maggie sustains after a fight. One of my favorite film critics, Mark Hobin once said ‘At its apex, the medium of film can capture a situation so perfectly that it goes beyond mere entertainment and matures into a reflection on the human experience. A presentation of characters so authentic and so raw that you forget that you’re sitting in a theater watching a movie, but have wandered into a circle of people and are now eavesdropping on their lives.’ That’s what Million Dollar Baby did to me. It blurred all lines of fiction.

The second half is probably one of the most depressing cinema ever filmed. It left me inconsolably sobbing. I wish film-schools make Million Dollar Baby a mandatory cinema for study. I wish all the aspiring film-makers and screenplay writers learn how to inundate the audience with a bond so powerful between characters that the film-going experience translates into a life changing one. When I was set to watch Million Dollar Baby, I expected to take a thing or two from it back home when it ended and make a good case for why Hotel Rwanda would have been a better choice for Best Picture, instead I found myself proclaiming it as one of the greatest movies ever made, and taking away the whole meaning of life itself when it ended. This is why I go to the movies.

(Hilary Swank trained 5 hours per day for this movie which resulted in her winding up with a potentially life-threatening staphylococcus infection. She chose not to tell Eastwood about this because she thought it would be out of character for Maggie. Just thought you should know, that real actors do exist, who live and breathe their art)

RATING :- 9.6 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.