Baahubali 2 – The Conclusion Review

Baahubali was a cultural standpoint in Indian cinema. In Indian cinema, full of washed up romantic musicals with old gags, the arrival of Baahubali blurred the lines of real and reel life – everyone was experiencing that same hope that the people of Mahistmati felt with the arrival of Mahendra Bahubali, the offspring of Amarendra Bahubali. The excitement for Baahubali 2 was quadrupled with the cliffhanger climax of the first installment and ‘Why did Kattapa kill Baahubali ?’ was the question hanging on everyone’s minds. And now we have the answer.

The dread that I carried in my mind since the release of the first installment unfortunately is now validated. The dread was that the sequel wouldn’t hold up. Everything about this movie is way over-the-top than it should have been, with the actions scenes reaching the limit of hilariousness. The action sequences of the first installment were original in terms of their choreography, however the ones in the second installment are repetitive, ridiculous and borrow heavily from Lord of The Rings- Two Towers.

The restraint that SS Rajamouli showed in Baahubali is completely missing in this work. The final work seems like the work of a toddler who was given all the crayons to paint a picture. Moreover, just painting characters as bound by their moral codes and drawing parallels to the epic Mahabharata so as to hide the shallowness of the central romance is just a very sleazy effort. The first installment was riveting, the second one is derisory.

Watching Baahubali 2 was seeing Murphy’s Law in action – everything that can go wrong did go wrong. But believe me, all fun is not lost. Go watch it with your friends, the ones who excel in sarcasm and rip every frame apart. Sitting alongside with me were a bunch of college kids who had bunked to watch this movie. Listening to their expletive-filled rants was the best time I had at the movies in recent memory. Unfortunately, I cannot say the same with respect to the movie. It sucked.

RATING : 4.5 / 10

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

Apocalypse Now Review

Apocalypse Now is loosely based on a book named ‘In The Heart Of Darkness’. Francis Ford Coppola in this 153 minute lacerating experience attempts one of the most ambitious and perilous endeavor in cinematic history – to transport his viewer right in the middle of the savagery which unfolded in Vietnam.

Apocalypse Now is more about the human mind rather than the war. It is easy to be fooled by this, since it does actively pursue its plot. But it is those abhorrent images which transpire on the screen that are the actual narrative. One could make the case, and to much success I presume, that Apocalypse Now has probably the greatest cinematic footage ever shot. The camera of Vittorio Storaro concots a pirouette of death all over. But even in the amidst of this violence, the screenplay by John Milius and Coppola still holds a spotlight over a bunch of characters towards whom we foster a sense of emotional attachment.

Coppola attempts to explore in Apocalypse Now, the concomitants of violence on the human mind. Take the scene with the Playboy bunnies which brings forth the animalistic libido fostered in men in continuous combat. However Coppola draws a line between the soldiers who fleet through this movie and the crew on board the boat. The crew that stays throughout this journey, a descendence from sanity to insanity, make an effort to preserve their humanity. There is an extremely heart-warming scene where Lance (Sam Bottom) takes on board a puppy which he finds in his ambush and takes care of it.

I have often come down hard on war movies while talking about them, and this maybe due to the fact of my personal beliefs that war holds no nobility or morality. Francois Truffaut once said ‘It’s not possible to make an anti-war movie, because all war movies, with their energy and sense of adventure, end up making combat look like fun’. However, Coppola seems to turn the tables on him, for the war here does look like fun, just not to the viewer.

Apocalypse Now belongs to the history books and it feels to me that whatever I talk about in praise of this movie will amount to nothing more than if I praise water. But sure as hell, I will never forget this movie. It held me spellbound and gaping at the violence that unfolds in war, and I couldn’t help but feel sorry for anyone who had to witness it. It is not an anti or pro war movie, but it sure is a pro-human movie.

RATING :- 9.5 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

2001 – A Space Odyssey Review

A few minutes before I began writing this review, my computer hangs. I try clicking the mouse button repeatedly, press random keys of my keyboard and hope something happens. Nothing does happen. I swear at my computer and give the monitor a few hits here and there. Nothing happens. I begin requesting the computer to start and let me write, for there are too many points treading through the expanse of my mind right now and if I don’t jot down them right now, I won’t ever be able to write this review, EVER. The screen flashes. The computer has regained its normal functionality. I begin wondering. Did it hear my pleads ? Did my computer just sense my feelings, my anguish ? I will never know.

These events are trivial, but if considered in a wider expanse hold an uncanny resemblance to the problems faced by the astronauts who are traveling to Jupiter on Discovery One. The computer system that governs the functioning of Discovery One, HAL 9000, has gone rogue. Catch is HAL 9000 presumably has feelings. The astronauts have planned to disconnect HAL’s logical thinking capabilities, his emotions. But unfortunately, HAL has another plans.

Stanley Kubrick, more than a genius, was a visionary. Towards the end of the movie, Kubrick is naked in front of his audience, a man who has lost all track of any limitations he might hold in his thoughts. Here he is, in front of his audience, a man unable to conceal the unimaginable depths of his vision. In 1968, two events concurred, one in the literary field while other in the cinematic field. The event in the literary field was the publication of Erich Von Daniken’s Chariots Of Gods and the event in the cinematic field was the release of 2001. These events coincide due to their purpose. Understanding human existence.

2001 and The Tree Of Life are the only movies which have attempted to put in a nutshell, the whole human existence. Maybe my polarized approach towards The Tree of Life is due to clash of ideologies of mine and Malick’s. The Tree Of Life is an ode, an affirmation to God and how he governs us. I personally relate more to 2001. People have often criticized 2001 for being impossible to comprehend in its end. I personally prefer that ending. I feel as if Kubrick, like me, is agnostic. The ending signifies that the very existence of our realm is inaccessible to us. So obviously, it is not for everyone !

The movie ventures through two time lines : The Dawn Of The Man and 2001. The only connecting thread is a mysterious black monolith. What does it do ? Absolutely nothing. It drives human curiosity is all. It remains beyond comprehension for humans and drives them towards other discoveries. If to symbolize anything, it might suggest a warp of time itself, where it flows seamlessly. That probably explains the movie’s slow pace. It is basically the fastest paced movie ever made. It traverses through the entire human existence within 142 minutes. What more can Kubrick do ?

2001 is less a movie, more an experience. The classical music draws you in and the slow pace puts you with these characters. Seriously, I felt a downward pull when the Moonbus lands. It lets you inhibit its astounding world. And the meticulous amount of detail given to the whole surroundings is astounding. For example, consider the scene where the space shuttle carrying Dr.Heywood lands on the Clavius Base. Kubrick very well knows the visual effects are sloppy and that the audience may find it cartoonish. But to project an image of an enormous spacecraft, he lets the background do the work, which is filled with projections of people, minuscule in their sizes which gives us an idea about the astounding size the shuttle may have, which is similar to the effect Jonathan Swift gave us about Lilliputians dealing with Gulliver, a giant in their eyes, in Gulliver’s Travels.

I had mentioned Chariots Of Gods before. Why ? Because here, in this paragraph, I tend to explain my analysis of 2001. So, for those who haven’t watched 2001 yet, SPOILERS IN THIS PARAGRAPH. SKIP TO THE NEXT ONE. So, the movie ends with David finding himself in a pod. Here he experiences a surreal experience by viewing himself in different stages, his present age, his old age and his birth. The monolith has been constructed and laid out by extraterrestrial beings. In the book Chariots of Gods, Erich had stated that the Gods that we worship, whom we attribute and thank for our intelligence, who seem to have laid out the very expanses of our planet are actually aliens. Erich Von Daniken says that aliens must have visited our Earth, millions of years ago, reproduced with the attractive females of our species, and in turn produced us, a combination of beauty and intelligence. 2001 seems like an ode to that idea. Kubrick has contemplated the aliens of higher intelligence as the God here and the encounter with monoliths are spiritual encounters in the scientific way. They are similar in nature to tesseracts and help to travel seamlessly through the expanse of time and lets David experience the universe in its full splendor, right from its inception to its present state.

2001 : A Space Odyssey may put some to sleep, but if you are one of those lovable, patient viewers who do not look at cinema just as moving images which flash on the screen for entertaining its viewers, you are in for an experience. Jean Luc Godard once said ,’Cinema is truth twenty-four times per second’. 2001 : A Space Odyssey doesn’t attempt to entertain its viewers at any point. It only attempts to enlighten.

Rating : 9.5 / 10

IF YOU HAVE WATCHED THIS MOVIE, WHAT DID YOU THINK ABOUT IT ? DO LET ME KNOW IN COMMENTS BELOW. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/pages/Demanded-Critical-Reviews/1565666967024477?ref=hl YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

 

 

The Good, The Bad & The Ugly Review

Sergio Leone’s The Good, The Bad & The Ugly is about bounty hunter Joe (Clint Eastwood) and Mexican outlaw Tuco (Eli Wallach) who form an unlikely partnership. Joe hands in Tuco for a reward and rescues him moments before he is hanged. This partnership hits rocks when Joe’s shot at the rope goes awry one time. But, they reunite under unlikely circumstances to search for a 200000 dollars treasure hidden in a cemetery, while Sentenza (Lee Van Cleef) closes in on their heels within a Civil War background.

Quentin Tarantino has cited this movie as the best shot movie in the history of cinema and the biggest influence in his film-making career. I can see why. It was the 60’s. Hollywood was gifted with classics like Breakfast at Tiffany’s, My Fair Lady, The Sound Of Music, La Dolce Vita and Mary Poppins. But the alpha male was subdued by these movies. He was feeling it gradually. He was on the verge of a revolt. He had enough of this dancing and kissing bullshit. He needed something raw and energetic. Something that he could cheer on and make him feel like a man again. And then came The Good, The Bad & The Ugly.

The tragedy lies therein. Sergio Leone never got much acclaim for this movie. The Good, The Bad & The Ugly is a trend-setter. A classic. See, whenever we think of Western movies, what do we think of ? We think of a cowboy, with a revolver in his hand, a cigarette on his lips, sitting on a horse within a breath-taking landscape. The seeds of the Western genre were sown in this classic. Everything that we now know about the Western genre originated from The Good, The Bad & The Ugly.

What a glorious movie ! This movie’s narrative is unfolded in a 178 minutes run time. But, there isn’t a single scene in the movie where you are bored. The intensity is building up like a pressure cooker. There isn’t much movement. When you are watching this movie, you will be serene. You will watch it just like any other movie. But when the explosive climax is set into motion, the tension will reach a climax. You will be biting your fingernails, or maybe, your toe nails, like in my case.

Many look upon the movie as a celebration of ultra-stylized no-nonsense violence and coolness and what not. It isn’t anything like that. If you just look closely, you will notice that the introduction of Joe, Sentenza, Tuco, i.e. The Good, The Bad, The Ugly takes about 30 minutes of the narrative. So, it means that the first thirty minutes were like a prologue to this epic, you just don’t notice it because of its entertainment value. These characters are as well sketched as any other.

It is not a journey to the cemetery in its true sense, it is a journey from one hurdle to another. These men are in constant peril, but what makes it such a rich story is the fact that they identify themselves with the trouble. They love this life. It is not the money that drives them, it is the peril. That feeling of their thickening when they are encountering an opponent who has an equal change of winning just like them. And that moment of victory is what keeps them going. They derive a certain pleasure from it, a psychological orgasm.

Okay, enough of this goddamn formality, this movie is super cool !!!!! Everything about it is cool. Its main theme, the way Joe lights a matchstick with his fingers, the way Tuco shoots from the bath-tub. And the dialogues ! They are splendid. But what obviously stands out is the tension. The emotions that Sergio Leone puts into force is unimaginable. Instead of great dispersed crowds, he takes in a few individuals and embroils a scene with their tension. Anything can happen, but it takes a hell lot of time to happen. And that’s where the score comes in. Every epic doesn’t become an epic until it has a score to supplement that. And Ennio Morricone does just that. The score is flawless.

And the cinematography ! Hey folks, did you enjoy watching Interstellar, Gravity and Inception in the theaters ? Say thanks to Tonino Colli. His cinematography broke the barriers in cine world, because the breath-taking shots of landscapes couldn’t be confined to 35 mm. These are jaw-dropping scenes, to say the least.

But at its core, the movie is about settling old scores. This is well apparent in the final scene of the movie, which I cannot describe in detail because I don’t want to spoil it for you. But a special mention of Tuco is much required. This is one of the greatest movie characters of all time. You may think Joe is the hero of this movie. Well, he ain’t, Tuco is. He handles the whole movie and also he so convincingly puts on a mask of goodness around him, that by the climax we forget he is ‘The Ugly’.

With its acting finesse, superb cinematography and a gritty score, The Good,The Bad & The Ugly is a movie of epic proportions and will remain a masterpiece and the most definitive movie of the Western genre.

Rating : 9.4 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. YOU CAN ALSO REQUEST A REVIEW OF A MOVIE OR SITCOM IN THE COMMENTS BELOW. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/pages/Demanded-Critical-Reviews/1565666967024477?ref=hl YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

Baahubali – The Beginning Review

Featured image

S.S.Rajamouli’s Bahubali – The Beginning is about Sivudu (Prabhas Raju) a tribal boy who longes to know what lies above the waterfall that is situated near his forest. After repeated attempts, Sivudu manages to reach the top of the mountain where he discovers Avantika (Tamannaah Bhatia). While following her, Sivudu discovers that she is part of a group of rebels, who aim to revolt against Bhallala Deva (Rana Daggubati) and free Devasena (Anushka Shetty) from Bhallala’s clutches. Sivudu falls in love with Avantika and volunteers to free Devasena to win Avantika’s heart. But little by little, Sivudu begins to discover his destiny and finds the secret that was unknown to him for years, that he is the son of the great king Mahendra Baahubali.

When I was watching Baahubali, I was like ‘Oh, that’s 300!’,’Oh, I have seen that in Lord of the Rings’,’Oh, that’s a complete rip-off from Troy/Hobbit’. But it was after the movie ended that the fact hit me. My mind was riddled with so many thoughts about those high-budget Hollywood extravaganzas because this movie too was not less than them if epic proportions is the deciding factor.

Mesmerizing is every fraction of a second of this movie. First of all, the acting is superb. Ms.Bhatia gives me glimpses of Neytiri from Avatar and Katniss Everdeen from The Hunger Games. Fortunately, she doesn’t just serve as an eye candy for the audiences and hero, she is at par when it comes to action and fuels all the anger required from a part as strong as hers. Ramya Krishnan is commanding as Sivagami. No one seems to match up with her when she is on-screen. It feels as if I was watching that opening sequence of Godfather where Marlon Brando just overpowers the acting prowess of the hugely talented cast around him. Prabhas himself as Baahubali provides all the charm and vigour and charisma that his ultra stylized hero requires. Rana Daggubati is, like always, awesome but still it always feels as if he has still not unleashed all the potential that he has. Sathyaraj as Kattappa serves the same role that Micheal Caine had in The Dark Knight, the wisest, bravest and loyal guy around, but he also has some hard-hitting action sequences in which he conducts himself brilliantly.

Baahubali is a great epic, no doubts to that. My first acquaintance with this flick happened at the annual Mumbai Comic Con where Rana Daggubati had come for the trailer launch of the movie. I watched some portions of it and experienced some of the epicness, but never expected it to be as awesome as this. Or maybe, my mind was clouded by the thumping of my heart due to the anticipation to meet Mark Gatiss. It was recently when I heard Dharma Productions had helmed the project and had invested a whooping sum 39 million dollars on the movie. It isn’t a big sum if you consider the amount put into Hollywood movies, but to invest such a sum into a movie which was not even in Hindi was commendable.

And every single penny invested in it shows. Sabu Cyril’s production design is epic in every respect. This fictional land is as vast and rich and intriguing as Westeros from Game Of Thrones. The opening credits too begin like Game Of Thrones, with a map of Mahishmathi Kingdom. I have watched too many Hollywood movies which has gained me a lot of exposure to great visual effects, C.G.I and unbelievable production design, but I assure you, Baahubali had some jaw-dropping moments in store for me too.

I rank the cinematography of the movie as the best I have seen this year along with Mad Max – Fury Road. That was a high-octane thrilling chase through wastelands, this is an epic war and story of betrayal set in a tone which reminds us of the epic Mahabharata. The lighting of the movie amazes me. The music of the movie is horrible. The songs were completely unnecessary in a flick like this and it also has an excruciating unrelated item song in the middle. But the lighting of that song just blew me away. There is a scene in which a dancer bends forward with a black and white background in the back. It gave such a poetic effect to that scene due to which that single shot stayed with me even after the movie ended.

The movie has a firm stronghold over its script. It wasn’t consumed by the high-budget it had gained access to. Some movies just squeeze in action sequences to set the cash registers ringing but Baahubali’s action sequences are well-choreographed and well shot. The action is superb. You will surely experience adrenaline pumping through your body during the high octane, thrilling and visually arresting action sequences of Baahubali. The movie doesn’t use that crappy shaky camera effect and it actually feels as if the hero himself is doing these stunts. It also doesn’t have an over-dependence on CGI, which worked very well in its favour.

The background score of the movie is exhilarating. The flamboyant portrayal of that war sequence wouldn’t have been complete without that heart-thumping, melancholic theme echoing through the cinema hall. The movie resorts to some cliches, and also begins with one, which shattered my hope about the movie at its inception itself but then restored it as well with its realistic depiction of this compelling epic. The visual effects supervisor also has some areas to work on, because that snow sequence felt as if I was watching The Grand Budapest Hotel but this India’s baby steps into this territory, so I guess that can be forgiven. Fortunately, this movie’s focus is one the characters. High-budget movies pays more attention to the action rather than the emotions but, there is a lot of character development in the movie and does make you give a damn about Sivudu. The movie may seem over-the-top at some points as well, but that’s where these characters live at, over-the-top. (literally)

Baahubali is a beautifully shot, visually arresting, flamboyant epic with high octane thrills and superbly shot action which is filled with intriguing characters who make this movie a must watch .

The ending and the twist of the movie may come as sort-of-abrupt to the viewers, because my mother too exclaimed ‘That’s the end?’ but let me assure you, it is perfect for setting the canvas for the final installment, because my mother later added that ‘I wanted more of it’. And that’s all I have to say about this.

Note : Please, do not Google anything related to this movie before you watch it. It will spoil your movie going experience.

Rating : 9.1 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. YOU CAN ALSO REQUEST A REVIEW OF A MOVIE OR SITCOM IN THE COMMENTS BELOW. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/pages/Demanded-Critical-Reviews/1565666967024477?ref=hl YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.