What Is The Greatest Cinematic Experience I Have Ever Had ?

What is it to have a great cinematic experience? As much as the art it derives its existence from, a great cinematic experience is subjective to its very core. I have read various testimonials of couples on the internet talking about how Norman Jewison’s Moonstruck made them fall in love with each other. I, on the other hand would readily make a case that watching a submarine fight while sitting on a beach would be a far better way to spend one’s time than watching the same movie in question.

In these few recent years during which I have fallen madly in love with this art form, the question of how a movie is perceived differently by every individual has hounded me persistently. And it’s not just confined to either a negative or positive response. Even to this day, the lovers of Francis Ford Coppola’s haunting masterpiece Apocalypse Now are debating whether to hail it as a pro or anti war movie.

One of the most pivotal and obvious reasons a movie may allure some and parry others is primarily because of its subject matter. A person who hasn’t gone through heartbreak may not think twice of Marc Webb’s (500) Days Of Summer after having seen it. However, it will stand out as a favorite of one who has experienced this heart-wrenching ordeal because the movie illustrates his life situation, which induces a personal experience for him in the cinema hall rather than a mere steady flow of 24 frames per second.

Another factor causing a major divide among the audiences is one’s perception of cinema itself. A friend of mine who lives a floor above hails Micheal Bay’s Transformers as the greatest movie he has ever seen. This opinion of his was obviously met by me with great dissent and inept sarcasm (Micheal Bay is so dumb he got locked in a grocery store and starved). But the more I think about it now, I don’t see his opinion to be flawed at all for when he walks into a cinema theater, all he expects to take from it seems to be unabashed entertainment which Bay seems to offer.

And as I realize now, I could go on and on about the various factors which seem to be responsible for this psychological phenomena, but none of them would be a concrete factor which one can consider the principal reason for a person to either hate or love a movie. In the end I truly believe, a movie is to a person what he is or has been.

But, dear reader, it was your inquisitiveness towards my own personal experience which brought you to this paragraph. And the answer to the titular question is a relatively well-known movie from Paul Thomas Anderson titled Magnolia. Why ?

Because after watching it, I knew the movie had changed me irreversibly, but I had no idea how. Many of the meaningful moments in our lifetime seem to ascertain themselves with deep, life changing philosophical depth, but somehow, the most important among them always seem to evade their greater meaning from us, as if to make us revisit and learn from them from time to time.

One of my greater fears I have as a human being is I have depleted my quota for the emotions a human being feels in his lifetime and what I am feeling now is just lesser version of what I have already felt. But after watching Magnolia, I knew I was feeling something deeper than anything I had felt, but I also knew I would never have the words to describe it.

For me watching Magnolia wasn’t just a cinematic experience, but more or less, a life experience. And a profound one too.

(Share your greatest cinematic experience and your thoughts on the different perception of movies in the comments)

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.comPhoto Rights : Google Images, Wikipedia

Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

Advertisements

Why I Don’t Love Superhero Movies

Featured image

I began watching movies since I was 7 and during that age my love for them was extended only to sports and comedy genres. After a few more years, romantic comedies and dramas came into that space. And when I became 11, I read the Sherlock Holmes stories after which I expanded my horizons and the thriller and horror genres came in. After watching Alfonso Cuaron’s Gravity I started appreciating the science fiction genre as well and The Raiders of the Lost Ark got me into action and archaeology. But, there is one genre that I still haven’t loved: Superhero movies.

Featured image

Superhero movies did excite me when I was a kid with nil knowledge about movies. I watched in delight the Iron Man and Spiderman movies but after some time, when I got acquainted deeply with Hollywood, I watched Chaplin, Zodiac, Good Night and Good Luck, Sherlock Holmes and Tropic Thunder. And I noticed a man who stole the scene in every scene that he acted. I saw a man who challenged the other actors with his performances and simultaneously improved their performances. I saw a great actor and then I saw Iron Man and Avengers. Robert Downey Jr. was stereotyped into a genre. That man who jumped within comedies and dramas and romantic comedies and even horror had stopped his routine because he had found the machine that was going to pay for his entire life. Why try to act in front of the camera and then sometimes receive criticism for it when you just have to go in front of the camera and just say some dialogues that the children will admire and make you a public favorite without much effort?

Featured image

We all know that Marvel will never stop making these movies. There will be another 6-7 sequels for Iron Man and 4-5 sequels to Avengers and Iron Man is part of the third Captain America movie as well and it is reported that RDJ will receive a 40 million plus salary for it. So he will earn what, another 250 – 300 million from the upcoming Marvel movies and by the time they end, he will be as old as Robert Duvall is right now. Then we can all agree that he won’t have much time left to give great performances. He will not be remembered as a great actor, but as the guy who put on a stupid iron suit and although the main work was done by the visual effects supervisor, walked away with a cool 200 mill.

Now, I do agree that the first Iron Man movie was a decent one. RDJ gave a good performance, the screenplay was good and it was enjoyable and sensible but once the first one gained critical and commercial success, the makers gained all the momentum required and started making balderdash. They had a gained a fan following that would be dedicated and would always forgive them for the movies that they make, because they would hope that there would be another one like the first. And by puking again and again over the hopes of the people, they make money.

Another problem with comic book movies is that they sort of appear to be catered only for comic book fans. I pity these fans, I really do. They go these movies expecting a good tribute to these heroes that made them laugh, cry and even inspired them in their life because they got a hero. Mostly nerds read these comics. Although I belong to a different species of the same kind, because I don’t like comic books or movies, I know how many of them feel. They don’t have many people to talk to, they lack the confidence to say something that they want tot to say and these heroes gave and still give them hope. They are given a feeling that there will always be someone who would be their best friend and listen to everything that they want to say and that they would never let any harm befall on them. And the feeling of seeing your heroes or friends in living skin is an experience just like I had when watching Harry Potter. And capitalizing on that feeling to make money is despicable. If you are trying to bring beloved characters that live in words on screen then utmost care should be taken so that they would be perfect to the people who idolize or love or despise them.

Featured image

Now let us move on to a time when this actually happened, i.e. Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy. It was a great move to rope in the guy who had made Insomnia and Prestige and Memento at that time. Nolan understood that although comics are about the good guy kicking the bad guy’s ass, there was actually a drama at their core. Nolan didn’t saw Bruce Wayne as a guy who put on a cool suit and sat in a cool automobile and defeated the bad guys, he saw Bruce as a broke guy who was trying to wipe out the underworld because of the negative impact that the underworld had on his childhood. And the Batman movies don’t have continuous action scenes throughout them; they are shot like a crime drama which is also a character study.

Featured image

For example, let us analyze the greatest superhero movie villain of all time – Joker. In every shitty superhero movie, you see a guy who wants to make money/ world domination on his mind/ just kills without any reason. But, Joker is broke. He had an abusive father and the love of his life left him which burned his faith in humanity. Then he saw Batman as the guy who represents humanity in its good sense and Joker felt that Gotham should also see humanity as it really is, darkness. Joker is not a freak, he is a symbol of the true nature of human beings, i.e. evil and Batman was shown as hope. And we all know how that worked. I too consider the Batman trilogy as one of the finest movies ever made.

So, in reality, I do not have a problem with superhero movies, I have a problem with the way they are presented. If they are given more thought and care and not just considered as a money making machine for the makers and the actors, then this is a genre that can actually revolutionize cinema and can appeal to its target audience and also the average moviegoer who just wants to see a good movie on the screen.

I hope you enjoyed this post, folks ! If you want me to write about anything related to the cine industry, or review a movie/sitcom or make a list about something cinema related, please post your request in the comments below.

PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/pages/Demanded-Critical-Reviews/1565666967024477?ref=hl YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

Photo Rights : Google Images, Wikipedia

Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.