Contagion Review

All great art is about something deeper than it cares to admit. On the surface Contagion maybe about a global pandemic, but beneath its masterfully crafted layers, it is about the only thing in the world that seems to spread faster than the virus in question in the movie – fear.

Steven Soderbergh uses the same hyperlink narrative style he popularized with his 2000 hit Traffic, and surprisingly, it yields even better results. Far reaching in its scope, Contagion brings about a feeling of oneness gradually through its narrative, in my opinion to highlight the collective emotions of empathy and fear the world trembles with irrespective of nationality in the times of such a pandemic.

Any talk about this movie would irreverent if it does not deem the medical world aspect of this tale worthy enough to broach. More than anything, I appreciated Contagion for not dumbing down its content so as to suit the general audiences. Although I am sure Soderbergh kept the science intact because of his integrity towards his work, it further accentuates the tension the movie generates because our incapability to comprehend the technical complications of dealing with a pandemic of such seriousness further helps in creating a feeling of helplessness in our minds. This helplessness further brought me closer to the hearts of the people in Contagion who live in constant fear not because of the deadly nature of the virus, but because of their ignorance and disillusioned nature regarding the resolving of this issue.

With a cast so large and so talented, it will be monotonous on my part to call out each one of them and appreciate them, for  every cast member shines in their role. However, I wouldn’t get a sound sleep tonight if I do not mention how Kate Winslet gives a shattering performance as Dr. Erin Mears. Whenever she is onscreen, Winslet establishes herself as the emotional backbone of this movie which is a stellar achievement in a cast that includes the likes of Marion Cotillard and Matt Damon among others.

The only fallacy in this near-perfect movie seems to be the sub-plot involving a blogger who utilizes this pandemic to generate profits. While I cannot make a case against the fact that this subplot falls short compared to others, this movie could not have been complete without it as well. How can a movie about the wide-reaching effects of a pandemic gives miss to the culpability the fourth estate amounts to in such situations ?

Contagion is a spine-tingling experience which goes about its matters in a discreet manner, and in turn, succeeds in creating an atmosphere which helps the viewer to pay attention and feel empathy for all the characters of this movie who are interspersed geographically but connected emotionally. And the last five minutes of this movie make a good case for it to contain the scariest ending of any movie ever made till date.

RATING :- 9.4 / 10

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M Review

 
Fritz Lang’s M works on two levels :- one as a police procedural and the second as a social criticism. It invites an open discussion on the plea of insanity regarding sexual abuse cases without maintaining a favorable position regarding each argument.
 
One of the main factors why M turns out to be such a stupendous final product is the fact that this film is devoid of any suspense. The actions of its characters are more mechanical in sense than thrilling.
 
Fritz Lang attempts to penetrate into the human mentality when provoked by uncertainty and dread. Lang weaves the structure of the movie as a social commentatory of the state of the society during Nazi Germany.
 
The gangsters in the movie are reminiscent of the wiseguys in The Godfather, for they wish to distance themselves from a crime so heinous in nature. Their attitude reflects that of the society which seems to find a justification for all the other criminals, but reserve rebuke for the ones tangled in abuse cases. However, Lang also provides a counter-argument to this case, not much with words, but with images. The scene where M tries to abduct another girl is heartbreaking in its nature, making my mind mimeograph the exact emotions the parents of the child might have felt when they found their child’s raped bodies.
 
Fritz Lang’s M is a rare movie, for it invites its viewers to actually think about the grave issues it presents rather than spoon feed the audience what they actually want to hear.
RATING :- 9 / 10

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes

Hush Review

The opening act of Hush is one to be studied. Everything that assumes importance in the second and third act are made acquaintance with the viewer in the first act itself without focusing on any of it. The dread that grips us seems so distant, yet when it does, it hits us with the pace of a peregrine falcon. Hush is the kind of thrillers which do not get made nowadays, it uses silence to create the feeling of utmost dread.

Kate Siegel gives a visceral performance as Maddie. It was so convincing that I actually thought she was mute and deaf. To see her transform from a scared soul to the ravage she transforms into towards the end is chilling. John Gallagher, who I have admired since his act as Jim in The Newsroom, sheds his charm and transforms brilliantly into a psychopath.

The editing is spell-binding, keeping us transfixed on the screen throughout the run time. I love the sharp-focus shots, and the rapid editing makes the pace quicken.

The only problem that I did have with this movie is the third act which seems sagging, and weak in terms of the first and second act. But it seems like a minor hindrance. I watched Hush with a good turnout of audience. And believe me, they were very interested.

RATING :- 9 / 10

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gone Girl Review (Spoiler Alert!)

 

I have watched Gone Girl twice now. Once as a thriller and once as a drama. Needless to say, it passed both the tests with flying colors. Gone Girl is not a movie for the faint-hearted, which should be palpable from the movies Fincher has given us the privilege of watching in the past (Se7en, The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, Zodiac). It is as much as a character study with the disintegration of a marriage as the stimulus and a complex criminal case.

Rosamund Pike is brilliant (or should I say amazing) in this movie, playing her character with a flair which I think can only be emulated by Carrie Ann-Moss. Ben Affleck is stupendous as Nick and so is Carrie Coon as his sister, Margo.

This movie is fabulous and here’s why :-

1.Representation of media :-

One of the main focus of the plot is on how media molds incorrect public opinions. The reason why it becomes impossible for Nick to get justice is because of the media’s shameful eagerness to ostracize and sham any individual for ratings. Many have criticized this movie as anti-feminist, however this very thought shows how correct this movie is. No one is talking about Nick getting wronged. It is a brilliant take on how on the surge of the noble feminist movement (which I wholly support), the media so as to cash in on anything of relevance, has begun masquerading as staunch feminists. I think it would have been okay even if within those fake masks they were hiding misandrist tendencies, but these assholes are in it just for the money and this finds an unabashed portrayal in Gone Girl.

2. Structure of the plot :-

David Fincher smacks us right on the face with his unreliable narrative. This is true film-making genius because the narrative remains the same, however the reliability of the narrator changes throughout the movie. The plot isn’t at all black-and-white, it’s all grey. All the characters are at fault here, yet in the end, Fincher makes us you still sympathize with one. THAT’S DIRECTING !

3.Rosamund Pike :-

Brilliant. Just wanted to say that again

4.Screenplay :-

Gone Girl is exactly the kind of script I would want on my table if I was a director. There are enough twists and turns to engage the audience for its run-time, and more than that, the intrigue stems off from the deceit and dual-nature of the characters, just like Game Of Thrones. It has some really funny one-liners, but what I found the most impressive is the fact that the writer exerted her control. Most of thrillers nowadays pick up on one fascinating thread and bind it with various unnecessary ones. In Gone Girl, the plot is compact, fast-paced and intelligent. The end of the movie is absolutely perfect, as if holding a mirror to realities of male-shaming by mislead misandrists and the frailties of modern marriages. And if you argue that this movie is anti-feminist, I have a pretty good case for Room being anti-meninist.

Gone Girl is a stupendous movie, which has enough twist and turns to engage you through the course of its run time and enough character revelations to engage you for your lifetime.

RATING :- 9. 3 / 10

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Room Review

Room confines us in a setting reminiscent of Plato’s myth of the cave. The confines of this space are shared by Joy and her son, who have been help captive in that room for seven years. Room is one of the most extraordinary tales to have been captured in film for it is a celebration of life like none other.

But the real struggle begins when they are free. We see Jack and Joy wading through a world as alien it can be to them, and starting to appreciate even the hellish life they lead in that shed called the Room. The movie is adapted from the book of the same name, which was loosely inspired by a real incident of the same nature, making this one of those rare cases where the truth is far more powerful than anything the imagination can invent.

Brie Larson is mesmerizing as Joy. Her performance brings about a honest brutality to her character missing in cinema since Charlize Theron graced the screen in Monster. Lenny Abrahamson creates extremely complex characters in the form of Joy and Jack, for they both form the emotional backbone of this movie. He materializes a beautiful mother-son relationship where both characters plunge into emotional distress, with only the thoughts of the other one helping them sail through.

Room creates an atmosphere through its deliberate slow-pacing to let the us, the viewers, soak in the same emotions Jack experiences when a whole world is thrown out to him, a world seemingly endless in comparison to his 11 ft × 11 ft existence. The scene in which Jack finally sees the world is one of the greatest moments in cinema, which in any given day, would give a stiff competition to the scene where Pandora surfaces on the screen in Avatar.

Room is one of those unforgettable experiences one cherishes long after the movie ends and is without a doubt, one of the greatest movies ever made.

RATING : 9.5 / 10

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

The Conversation Review

On the outer side, Francis Ford Coppola’s The Conversation looks like a nerve-wracking thriller, but the truth is, it is not about the plot as much as it is about the character. It is common to be mistaken by this fact and then be disappointed about this movie, because it creates an environment where it does actively pursue the plot. But all it is about is a character pursuing his innermost fears in an out-of-proportion blown morality crisis. The thrilling stuff is just the backdrop of it all.

The man at the center stage is Harry Caul, played by Gene Hackman, who is a professional surveillance expert. He maintains a neutral status about his line of work, for he believes that whatever the tapes he has recorded amount to, he has no responsibility.Until a case pops up where he develops a concern for the two individuals in question and things start going haywire.

Now when I say things start going haywire, it also, and mainly concerns his personal life. This is a character of so many layers and the movie explores the nature of his personality by using the moral crisis. The real mystery is not the plot, it is the character.

The plot on the other hand delves into the ethics of the world of surveillance. It attempts to open the doors of closed rooms  that we are so often thrilled and petrified of. And this is one of the few movies (Ace In The Hole is the only other one I recount) in which the theme explored holds relevance to the modern time rather than the one in which it was made and to more horror, I think instead of waning, this relevance is bound to enhance.

The movie encapsulates the master storytelling ability of Coppola with eerie silence used to generate paramount fear to best effect. Coppola transcends Hitchcock’s ability to explore obsessions, and let’s just say, that Palme D’Or was rightfully deserved.

The Conversation is one of the most engaging thrillers ever made, for it manages to create thrills out of the most inexplicable elements of cinema – emotions. And whether you like it or not, believe me, after watching this movie, there will be an irregular check of the sides of your telephone or the curtains. Just in case….

Rating : 9.2 / 10

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

Jackie Brown Review

Quentin Tarantino’s Jackie Brown is about Jackie Brown (Pam Grier) a flight attendant who carries money illegally from Mexico to United States Of America for gun dealer Ordell Robbie (Samuel.L.Jackson). But when she is busted by Ray Nicolette (Micheal Keaton) an ATF officer, she hatches a plan along with Max Cherry (Robert Forster) to help Ray catch Ordell and get away with Ordell’s money.

Jackie Brown is more or less on the lines of The Godfather. The characters are schemers. They talk, they plan, they dispose, they again plan and so on till the explosive climax. The movie is slow and tensely gripping. It begins as a Tarantino movie should with a stylish opening sequence.

The movie then progresses at a very slow pace which may be a letdown for Tarantino fans out there who are accustomed to his fast moving, entertaining and violent cinematic style. There is not much going on. But characters keep coming in. It is a game of chess laid out on the screen. The pawns move first and then we take out the big guns. The movie’s actual plot begins in a hour.

It is a very complex plot in itself, being based on a novel Rum Punch. There is an ingenious plan  set into motion in the climax of the movie which will assure you that your time hasn’t been spent futile. It was more or less considered as relaunch pad for Pam Grier and Robert Forster and even if it was, I don’t mind for both are superb. Robert Forster is the main attraction of the stellar cast. We can’t take our eyes of him ad his chemistry with Pam Grier is awesome. Like we comprehend there is a sensual thing going on between them and we know it, they know it but it is never said till the climax. Samuel.L.Jackson as Ordell is fabulous and has an evil menace to him. Robert DeNiro has given one of his rare bad performances. He doesn’t do much, hell it sucks.

The major disappointment is obviously is the dialogues. There are some stylish entries here and there but the Tarantino charm is missing. Even in Kill Bill, where it was a matter of solace there was dialogues among the visual spectacle of severed heads, amputated hands and crushed eyeballs, there were superb conversations, like the one about the goldfish and about comic book superheroes. There is a noteworthy lack of such superb pieces of dialogue writing in Jackie Brown, which can be in a way attributed to the fact that this wasn’t a Tarantino original, this was an adaptation. But that doesn’t cover up for the fact that Tarantino has failed in this department which is his trademark.

Jackie Brown is raw, slow paced and gripping with stellar performances by Robert Forster and Pam Grier but the slow paced first half maybe a big let down for the fans of fast paced cinema which is Tarantino’s forte and the insipid dialogues aren’t what we expect from Quentin Tarantino, it is entertaining nonetheless.

Rating : 8 / 10

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.