The Wizard Of Oz Reviewed & Analyzed

The fact that a MGM musical is still celebrated by cinema lovers world over is an astonishing certitude. But after watching The Wizard Of Oz, I laugh in the face of the qualms I had regarding this movie before watching it. There isn’t a movie worthy enough of its position in world cinema than this adaptation of the Frank Baum classic by Victor Fleming.

I won’t get myself in the trouble of trying to explain its plot for the moment, for it’s as famous as the movie itself and so silly yet genius that I haven’t yet developed such a mastery of English language that it can be summarized by me within a paragraph.

The movie is a celebration of everything that we love about fantasies – characters reeking of innocence in a world which doesn’t. But rather than praising its beautiful and hilarious songs, the wonderful production design or the fabulous performances, I would much like to dedicate this post to why this MGM musical of 1939 still holds its ground in a world so strongly inhibited by the likes of Kubrick and Hitchcock and everyone else. And the only reason which seems to transpires before me except for the historical importance it reeks of for the use of Technicolor is the plot of the movie.

So, the movie’s central protagonist is Dorothy Gale who as you might know, unless you have been living under a rock for the entire course of your lifetime, gets transported by a cyclone to the land of Oz where she meets the Scarecrow (one who wishes for a brain), Tin Man (one who wishes for a heart) and the Cowardly Lion (one who wishes for courage). Together, they embark on the journey to Crystal Palace, to meet Oz who will fulfil all their desires. (A paragraph which seems to contradict my earlier statement about summarizing the plot of this movie in a paragraph, but believe me, reading this and thinking you now know the entirety of the plot of this movie would be to look at one brick of the Great Wall Of China and say that’s all there is to it)

The Scarecrow, Tin Man and Lion for me seem to epitome the innermost desires of Dorothy’s which seems to give the entire movie a surreal underlining which I will go into later. The Scarecrow seems to be a metaphorical representation of Dorothy’s yearning, or more better a child’s yearning, to be considered equal in his/her intelligence by the adults. In the beginning one can see how Dorothy’s family members seem to dispose of her troubles without giving it a moment’s thought, most probably giving her the idea that they consider her asinine, and thus the yearning to be intelligent.

The origin of Cowardly Lion can be traced back to when Zeke advises Dorothy to be a little brave while facing Almira Gulch. Dorothy’s reluctance to accept her consternation about Gulch seems to be the reason why the Cowardly Lion seems so unabating in making his cowardly nature so obtrusive.

Then what about the Tin Man who wishes for a heart to feel with, a quality which Dorothy seems so abound of ? I believe this is her yearning for Miss Almira Gulch, which further affirms her goodness.  Although the Wicked Witch of the West seems to be a representation of Gulch I believe it is restricted here to only her physicality and her hate for Toto. Tin Man here possesses the same yearning which Dorothy wishes came true for Gulch as well, thus making him a projection of the Gulch Dorothy wants her to be.

And about Oz itself ? It seems much to be a work of Dorothy’s subconscious rather than a parallel reality. The fact that the passage of time in the dream world is much faster than compared to the real world also explains the length of the journey as well. It seems Dorothy’s subconscious creates a world of imagination, inhibits it with characters which are reflections of her own self and introspect about her existence.

Or is this reading too much into nothing ? Is my chain of thought reminiscent of the way the adults in the movie reject the notion of Oz at the end of the movie ?

Whatever it may be, the creation of a child’s innocent subconscious or an unimaginable reality, The Wizard Of Oz is one of the most delightful movies to have ever come out and had me from that moment where Aunt Em says to Almira that ‘Miss Gulch, I now know exactly what I think about you, but I can’t say it because I am a Catholic’.

RATING :- 9.4 / 10

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes

M Review

 
Fritz Lang’s M works on two levels :- one as a police procedural and the second as a social criticism. It invites an open discussion on the plea of insanity regarding sexual abuse cases without maintaining a favorable position regarding each argument.
 
One of the main factors why M turns out to be such a stupendous final product is the fact that this film is devoid of any suspense. The actions of its characters are more mechanical in sense than thrilling.
 
Fritz Lang attempts to penetrate into the human mentality when provoked by uncertainty and dread. Lang weaves the structure of the movie as a social commentatory of the state of the society during Nazi Germany.
 
The gangsters in the movie are reminiscent of the wiseguys in The Godfather, for they wish to distance themselves from a crime so heinous in nature. Their attitude reflects that of the society which seems to find a justification for all the other criminals, but reserve rebuke for the ones tangled in abuse cases. However, Lang also provides a counter-argument to this case, not much with words, but with images. The scene where M tries to abduct another girl is heartbreaking in its nature, making my mind mimeograph the exact emotions the parents of the child might have felt when they found their child’s raped bodies.
 
Fritz Lang’s M is a rare movie, for it invites its viewers to actually think about the grave issues it presents rather than spoon feed the audience what they actually want to hear.
RATING :- 9 / 10

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes

Guardians of the Galaxy – Volume II Review

When Guardians of the Galaxy hit the theaters in 2014, I hailed it as the superhero movie Quentin Tarantino would have made because of its ultra-cool quotient. The second installment in the series however diverges from its predecessor and is laden with emotional overtones. The plot is concerned with the questions that baffled us all in the climax of the first installment :- Who is Star Lord’s father ? How was he able to hold onto the Infinity Stone ?

And it does a good job in answering them. When I think about it, I think I couldn’t have asked for a better sequel for this series. The movie delves into what makes it so much more endearing as compared to The Avengers, the emotional core of these groups of misfits. Here they are, with all their layers peeled off, completely emotionally naked before the viewer.

The character who I believe deserves a special mention is Rocket Raccoon. He may probably be one of the most original characters to have graced the silver screen in the 21st century. His cocky attitude, his pugnacious one-liners held me spell-binded. The fact that he is so darn cute doesn’t hurt as well.

The few nodus in this movie would be foremost the eagerness of James Gunn to revive the same magic and style of the prequel. Even though completely different in terms of their style, one being unabashedly cool and the other emotional, Gunn attempts to load the narrative with gags which eventually start wearing off. Also, the prequel had left a pretty high bar for the soundtrack section which in my opinion it fails to live up to except for Father & Son by Cat Stevens, which adorns a beautiful emotional ending .

To sum it, Guardians of the Galaxy – Volume 2 is a hell lot of fun, with well-fleshed out characters and a surprisingly moving story arc. It is a sequel which in more ways than one lives up to its smashing predecessor, and is a great addition to this space-western saga.

RATING : – 8 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes

 

 

Stalker Review

I was recently watching one of THR’s Roundtables in which the host, Stephen Gallaway posed a very interesting question. He asked ‘If you had the chance of preserving one movie before the apocalypse, which would it be?’ I am affirmative that I would reply Andrei Tarvosky’s Stalker. It is a fantasy movie made for the people who hate fantasy movies.

One of the very few job requirements a film critic is supposed to have by default is an ebullient attitude towards movies with slow-pacing, and most of the times, it rules me out. Stalker begins on a sombre note with snail-aced long takes. But for some reason, the atmosphere of Stalker with its enigmatic music and color composition had me already spell-binded. Later, I read that I wasn’t the only one one had encountered with this quandary. Many suggested had suggested to Tarvosky that the movie should be more dynamic in nature, to which he replied ‘The film needs to be slower and duller at the start so that the viewers who walked into the wrong theatre have time to leave before the main action starts.’

But once he overcomes that starting hiccup, Tarvosky rewards his viewer with an unforgettable spectacle of visual poetry set into motion. The plot is centered around a Stalker who leads a professor and a writer through The Zone, a mysterious restricted piece of land which holds a room which is said to fulfill the innermost desires of any man who enters it. The structure of this so-called Zone deserves a movie of its own, for the roots of its existence are ground so deep in the waters of surrealism that it would put Salvador Dali to shame.

The movie more than often reminded me of Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now which couldn’t care less about the journey which its characters undertake. Instead, it works as an anatomy of the innermost desires of its characters, revealing to us their cherished beliefs and their exploration of the meaning of life. The movie is filled to the brim with intriguing philosophical conversations which seem to give equal importance to both ends of the spectrum, acting as a catharsis for these characters, all of whom seem to be leading extremely wretched lives.

The movie questions the very nature of the existence of such a Zone and its usefulness. It forces us to introspect and delve deep within ourselves and examine our very own innermost desires. In my personal experience, it resulted in a startling revelation of what I considered myself to be and what I am as a person.

Stalker is an enigmatic and surprisingly moving motion picture which will forever remain one of cinema’s most treasured gems. They don’t make them like this anymore.

RATING :- 9.5 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Come & See Review

I was scared of myself while watching Come & See. The characters in the movie look straight into the camera, with gazes and faces which will penetrate anyone’s heart, and run, amok with fear, as if the viewer himself is a devil they have come face to face with. It creates a ghastly atmosphere for the events set to unfold, which are an exploration into the evil which resides within all of us.

Almost all war movies maintain a zeal for self-censorship with respect to the audience. Come & See however keeps hold of its colossal power on its audience through the brutal violence it showcases, turning my living room into a battlefield in itself. It didn’t have shots fired all around it, but I could sense my living room being filled with all the emotions of the characters of Come & See, and to needlessly clarify, none of them are anything close to pleasant. The movie works as dissection of the human conditions during the World War II and all its despicable violence. It seems to encompass all of life itself, even paving a way for a lust-driven, yet heartfelt romance which we root for.

Albus Dumbeldore once said ‘Do not pity the dead, Harry. Pity the living and above all, those who live without love.’ There is a scene in this movie where hundreds of villagers are burnt alive in a woodshed. Their screams of anguish create immeasurable dread further accentuated by the laughs of the Nazis. Tears welled up in eyes not for the victims, but for the survivors. How can one ever witness such inhumanity and not lose faith in life ? Klimov begs us to feel sorry, not for the dead, but for the living who die with every passing second of their lives due to the indelible scars the violence which materialized has left on their minds. The ones who will be plagued the rest of their lives with nightmares of their dear and near ones getting burnt to death. The ones who will have to live their rest of their lives trying to forget those cries of anguish.

Come & See isn’t without its own share of faults. It is not devoid of melodrama at times, and in the end, a patriotic streak towards Russia. However, none of these flaws seem have any effect on the final turnout. That maybe because unlike other movies which act like puppies wanting to be petted by everyone, Come & See actually takes a stance. Fearlessly it proclaims what it actually thinks about the SS soldiers – Satan in a uniform.

RATING :- 9.3 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baahubali 2 – The Conclusion Review

Baahubali was a cultural standpoint in Indian cinema. In Indian cinema, full of washed up romantic musicals with old gags, the arrival of Baahubali blurred the lines of real and reel life – everyone was experiencing that same hope that the people of Mahistmati felt with the arrival of Mahendra Bahubali, the offspring of Amarendra Bahubali. The excitement for Baahubali 2 was quadrupled with the cliffhanger climax of the first installment and ‘Why did Kattapa kill Baahubali ?’ was the question hanging on everyone’s minds. And now we have the answer.

The dread that I carried in my mind since the release of the first installment unfortunately is now validated. The dread was that the sequel wouldn’t hold up. Everything about this movie is way over-the-top than it should have been, with the actions scenes reaching the limit of hilariousness. The action sequences of the first installment were original in terms of their choreography, however the ones in the second installment are repetitive, ridiculous and borrow heavily from Lord of The Rings- Two Towers.

The restraint that SS Rajamouli showed in Baahubali is completely missing in this work. The final work seems like the work of a toddler who was given all the crayons to paint a picture. Moreover, just painting characters as bound by their moral codes and drawing parallels to the epic Mahabharata so as to hide the shallowness of the central romance is just a very sleazy effort. The first installment was riveting, the second one is derisory.

Watching Baahubali 2 was seeing Murphy’s Law in action – everything that can go wrong did go wrong. But believe me, all fun is not lost. Go watch it with your friends, the ones who excel in sarcasm and rip every frame apart. Sitting alongside with me were a bunch of college kids who had bunked to watch this movie. Listening to their expletive-filled rants was the best time I had at the movies in recent memory. Unfortunately, I cannot say the same with respect to the movie. It sucked.

RATING : 4.5 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

Little Miss Sunshine Review

The greatest feeling a viewer can experience after watching a movie is feel thankful for every second of his existence leading up to the point where the ending credits roll, a thankfulness for being alive just to watch this movie. I felt it after The Shawshank Redemption the last I remember. Here I am, with tears in my eyes I swear to Nolan, writing about Little Miss Sunshine.

It is about a journey these six characters, all starkly different from the other, undertake to contest in a beauty pageant called ‘Little Miss Sunshine’. What ensues in this trip is complete mayhem and how the characters reconnect with each other after a huge dramatic twist. Each of these characters have such an inexplicable adorable vibe to them that I walked out of this movie wishing a stand alone movie for each of them.

Alan Arkin is mind-blowing as the swearing, heroine-snorting horny grandpa whose advice to his grandson Dwayne, an individual who has taken a vow of silence adhering to the principles of Neitzsche, is ‘fuck a lot of women‘. The ones offended by this is naturally the father of the boy, Richard, a man who is reminiscent of Walter from The Big Lebowski. While Walter’s mojo was Vietnam, Richard can relate anything in the world to a nine-step program he has devised for attaining success. In the midst of all this maelstrom is probably the cutest character of 21st century cinema, Olive Hooper played by Abigail Breslin, who with her rimmed glass and a heart-melting smile plastered a smile on my face throughout this movie.

This movie meant a lot to me personally because the underlining theme is about how failures make a man. Each of the characters here deal with unfulfilled dreams about aspirations and standard of living. Yet, as the movie progresses, the realization dawns upon how family always comes first, apparent from a climax which is as hilarious and heart-warming as any sequence in cinema can be.

My heart burst out with joy after watching Little Miss Sunshine. The opening shot is of Olive watching a beauty pageant and mimicking the actions of the winner. Tears rolled down my face with that very shot itself. That beautiful marriage of visuals, music and the innocence of Olive reminded me of those times when I pretended to win an Oscar. No moment in cinema has ever meant that much to me. It was a perfect shot.

RATING :- 9.5 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.