Synecdoche New York Review

Synecdoche New York is a movie about movies, but not in the conventional sense. Its affairs do not concern themselves with scrutinizing the method of crafting a narrative, but rather the intentions behind doing so.

What is it to have a true cinematic experience ? I believe it is the singularity of emotions an audience coming from different paths of life experiences when watching a movie. A person feeling the same joy, same sadness, same intrigue as the one sitting next to him. In Synecdoche New York, what Kaufman does is create a world where characters morph into each other every passing scene and subject themselves to desolation of the others, scrutinizing how we as a species react in a state of singularity to same events. But its vision is not limited to the confines of the screen. This movie rather plays outside it. It makes us aware of the actors we are in our perceived reality constructing our own worlds with our own actions while seemingly attributing it to preconceived destiny.

As all great movies made about life are, essentially what defines Synecdoche New York is a quest for a meaning to one’s existence. What Kaufman says is melancholic, but harshly true and beautiful like the poem about spring that opens this movie. Our quest seems to be for a permanent meaning, yet we ourselves change every passing day. All our previous selves survive inside us somehow, and each of them have ascertained themselves with different meanings. Our folly is we yearn for a permanent meaning for our multiple selves, eventually subjecting ourselves to believe in a nihilistic mindset, missing the bigger picture.

As most of Charlie Kaufman’s work has been, Synecdoche New York is a comedy as well. It’s just that it doesn’t rely on gags and one-liners to crack the audience up. Rather it is the irony that even after having every disease imaginable, Caden outlives almost everyone and that this movie begins and ends at 7:45. Does that say something about why it is so convoluted and abstract ? If you look a bit closer at the absurdity of the events, I believe it surely does.

For better or worse, this is a movie about everything. It charters life from the point where thought originates in an individual and subjects the viewer to a downright depressing or hilarious ride, varying on whether you are all worked up when it ends or you have an ironic smile when it does, respectively.

The first time I watched Synecdoche New York, it felt incomplete to me. The second time I realized it was to be completed by my own inadequacies and fears. There are bad movies, passable movies, good movies, excellent movies and great movies. And once in a blue moon, there are movies like Synecdoche New York. These are movies which you feel you can’t tell people about, movies that are so special and so yours that advertising your affection feels like a betrayal. It sure isn’t the greatest movie ever made or anything, but Synecdoche New York is my movie, just as my body is my body and my thoughts are my thoughts. The day I find someone worth recommending it, my God, that would be the day.

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes

 

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War Of The Planet Of The Apes Review

There couldn’t have been a more apt time for the War Of The Planet Of The Apes to have graced the silver screen. At a juncture where every big-budget movie seemed to be only style and no substance, War Of The Planet Of The Apes refreshes our memories of what the word ‘blockbuster’ once stood for. Made at the expense of one hundred and fifty million dollars, this third installment of the celebrated Planet of the Apes franchise proves with every single frame why it deserves every dollar of it.

The events follow the aftermath of the Koba mutiny which ensured a war between the apes and the Simian flu affected human beings. I won’t delve further into it for it needs to be experienced than told in my opinion. Rather I would like to scrutinize into the various odd aspects of it, some major and mostly minor in their scale, which I believe when summed up makes this movie what it is. And what it is, is a near fucking-masterpiece.

Let’s begin with a scene which occurs much later in the movie. The Colonel, a leader of a paramilitary organization, and Caesar, the leader of the apes, have a stand-off of sorts. In any other movie, I might have sighed with the exasperation of the  predictable nature of such scenarios in movies. But in War Of The Planet Of The Apes, I was nerve-wracked with tension on how it was going to play out. For these weren’t predictable characters whose actions bore by-the-book consequences. They were something truly original.

I believe everything in the movie up to the point mentioned above was a build-up to it, and the release was more than worth it. The artistic composition of this build-up can be written ceaselessly about, and the writing of this review is going to be an onerous struggle to end it, but that would be the last of the things to deter me.

The first ginormous excellence of War Of The Planet Of The Apes is its meditative pacing which gives ample time for character development. As the movie plays out, Caesar who has been seemingly omniscient for the larger part of this tale withers into a reflection of Koba himself. The plodding pace gives us time to reflect upon the previous events which have transpired, contemplate upon them and experience and reason on the transcendence of Caesar into darkness, bit by bit.

On the other hand, Woody Harrelson’s character is established and his ideologies construed in a single scene in which he delivers one of the most emotional monologues I can recount in cinematic history. The tension and the emotions of his words do not spring a constant release. Instead, they coil in on themselves creating an introspective mood for not only the Colonel, but Caesar himself.

The atmosphere of War Of The Planet Of The Apes is sullen, dark and extremely urgent, with the elements of nature seemingly closing in on themselves. The opening scene sprung memories of the colorful helmets the soldiers in Full Metal Jacket adorned, while the constructions of the concentration camps brings back memories of the Holocaust.

But, none of these stupendous achievements seem to hold weight when I think about what holds this masterpiece together. And all I can seemingly recount is Nova. She is a girl with a smile so beautiful that trying to describe it in the petty confines of language seems demeaning to its visceral beauty. Although one might assume in contrast, the entire movie lies on her shoulders, which she carries off in the same subtlety with which the girl in the red coat carried Schindler’s List.

Another stupendous scene is concerned with the discovery of an ape in hiding, high on emotions which cuts through the loneliness one is ridden with in such dark times. To sum it all up, which seems more and more a taxing endeavor with every word I am writing, a great sequel is the one which makes you appreciate even the flaws of its predecessor. War Of The Planet Of The Apes encapsulates that.

It is a movie about apes, but I am pretty darn sure that this masterpiece would be more or less the greatest ode to humanity that you would have the privilege of witnessing on the silver screen till the Times Square Ball drops in the near future.

RATING :- 9.5 / 10

(P.S.It would be a crime against the very notion of film-making if this work doesn’t get a Best Picture nod, Andy Serkis a Best Actor nod, and the various technical aspects nominations in their own respective categories)

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Only Yesterday Review

I could never make sense of the division of fractions which involved reversing the numerator and the denominator to multiply. I hated Mathematics, and was always better in writing essays, although my loved ones would choose the former in favor of the latter any given day. And I also happen to be a very picky eater. So when I watched Isao Takahata’s Only Yesterday, I felt like hugging myself, having found an acquaintance in Taeko which I had never found in real life. And guess what ? She is a girl.

Although I admire American animation (Wall-E and Ratatouille adorn my Great Movies collection), I have with good reasoning always considered it inferior to Japanese animation. I have strongly felt that computer animation can never top the beauty that hand-drawn strokes evoke, which seem to transcend every frame from a mere cartoon to a larger than life experience.

Furthermore, there seems to be a dearth of strong-willed, free-spirited female characters in American animation. With the exception of only Merida from Brave, every animated movie from the United States seems hell-bent to constrain girls into thinking that finding the Charming Prince Perfect seems to be their only tryst with destiny.

And here comes a wonderful bundle of joy from Japan which addresses both these pressing issues without ever drawing attention towards them. The more I think about it, the more I admire the way Takahata has incorporated the aspects American animation has evaded and even more, the tranquil manner of doing so.

At a time where the fairer sex is finally getting the representation they deserve, movies like Only Yesterday are boons. It creates a character who is relatable and lovable irrespective of the confines of gender and nationality. Having Takahata as the screenplay writer helps, for Taeko encapsulates the male interpretation of female puberty, helping the male audience to be never distant from her.

Instead of the corrals a hard-bound screenplay has in store, Takahata succeeds in creating an experience. There is a plot, but it willingly takes the backseat when the characters assume control. What results is something more or less like life itself – sometimes painful, sometimes joyous and limitless ennui.

And further greater is the painstaking manner of staging scenes. Take a scene where a boy from school admits his love to Taeko. He comes in nervously, blushing, and stands speechless. An awkward silence follows, finally broken by him asking Taeko whether she prefers a sunny, cloudy or rainy day. She replies cloudy and he smiles in mutual agreement. What follows for the next minute is a wonderful silence, crafting one of the most romantic moments I have seen in cinema. Unlike other movies, there isn’t a fatuous conversation that follows to ascertain their love. Takahata seems to know that silence fills the voids as well.

Another great scene involves Taeko asking permission to act while having dinner. She poses the question, and glances at her mother. Her mother glances, at her father, with Taeko’s vision too shifting to him. Without a single word, Takahata shows where the power centers lie in the house.

The ending is something to be seen to be believed. An entire world channelizes a decision which would have been corny in any other scenario. Maybe that’s how the movie can be pretty much summed up as well ‘It is something to be seen to be believed’.

RATING :- 9.5 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes

E.T.The Extra Terrestrial Review

In the climax of The Great Dictator, Charlie Chaplin delivers what can be easily considered as the greatest monologue in cinematic history. There is a sentence from that great speech which reverberated in my mind after I watched E.T. – ‘We think too much and feel too little.’ Maybe all the nasty opinions of this movie can be summarized by these words of Chaplin.

E.T.The Extra Terrestrial is about a troubled child who finds an alien out in the woods, and then decides to help it return home. The alien in question is a hideous creature which would scare the living daylights out of any child, but that is Spielberg’s gamble, for this is a man who understands what it is to be a child and what it is to truly love.

Steven Spielberg has been a maverick magician of his own league. While his colleagues attracted universal acclaim with their hard-edged, serious, mature work, Spielberg won the world over with his childish vision. Maybe, this has proved detrimental in the long run for him to be considered one of the greatest in this world of art. But there is no denying, without Spielberg, I would have never loved cinema. When I watched Indiana Jones, I knew exactly what I wanted to do – to be an archaeologist ! And with every movie he came up, he made me fall in love with cinema a bit more.

As a critic, I can surely point out the flaws. But that’s the thing about movies like E.T.The Extra Terrestrial, you don’t give a slightest damn about them. For me, and countless others, movies like E.T. are no less than The Tree Of Life, for what we feel seems to be what we take away. I have watched E.T. countless times, and none of these times with dry eyes.

Whenever I watch E.T., I cry and I pity those who cannot love this movie. For if they cannot feel E.T., what in the world can they feel ? They have grown too old not for such movies, but seemingly for life itself. E.T. stands out as an achievement in cinema for it seems one can never to be too young to watch it, and never be too old to fall in love with it.

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American Graffiti Review

With college so nigh, I am doing what probably all my other colleagues are doing right now, fretting about the uncertain future and remembering the days of stability and security of high school. While on this futile journey of nostalgia, I have come across a truth about myself which on the whole doesn’t seem to fit with the perception I have of myself as a person. What I have realized is I don’t miss high school. One bit.

Today, I visited my school for a reunion of sorts. As I went through this swarm of people who I had spent almost twelve years of life with, I have never felt so alienated in my entire life. Adults reminisce about high school quite fondly, some wishing more than anything else to go back to those days. On the contrary, I realize what an exercise in futility it all was – wasting time learning stuff I would never use, making friends who haven’t had half the decency to call me in almost three months. But, there is something valuable that lingers on – moments.

Moments that I have collected throughout my school years are treasures for when every single one of them was materializing, it felt as if my life wouldn’t be the same after them. That’s what makes American Graffiti so relatable in contrast to Dazed & Confused. Coming from a country where parents are more conservative than religions in question, the focus Lucas has on how the characters consider a fleeting image of a beautiful blonde whispering something a life-changing moment really hits me.

The reason why American Graffiti seems so endearing is without a doubt its characters, all seemingly clueless about their life. When it ended, there was nothing more I wanted to do than go to these and characters and whisper in their ears that they would have all the perspective they want in a month or two.

Maybe this isn’t much of a review, but it should read as one, a highly positive one considering how personal the impact of this movie is. And in the end, Lucas leaves us with a word of wisdom. For me, it was that nostalgia is a dirty liar that insists things were better than they. For lots of others, it was that nostalgia is an ephemeral composition of disjointed memories. Basically saying, if you are on a date, and you grin while your girlfriend looks grim when the credits roll, you guys have some serious thinking to do.

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Ace In The Hole Review

There is a simple, yet powerful quote that hangs in the office of Albuquerque Sun-Bulletin where Kirk Douglas’ character Chuck Tatum works. It says’ Tell The Truth’. From its humble beginnings in Strasbourg to the industry churning billions per year it is now, the fourth estate has changed for worse. A Good Samaritan initiative which stood for truth above everything else now has deteriorated into a ruckus of so-called ‘journalists’ all waiting eagerly for tragedies to lap up like street dogs who wait for the biscuits the good old man throws their way during his evening walk.

Chuck Tatum is that growler who eats up all the biscuits without giving the hungry ones behind him even the pleasure of a single crumb. While on his way to cover a story about a rattlesnake hunt, Tatum chances upon a human interest story – in other words, the whole biscuit factory. And he sure as hell doesn’t want anyone else to have shot at it except him. And what unfolds for the rest of this movie’s run time is a repugnant pother which has aged liked wine.

If there was ever a spiritual prequel to Sidney Lumet’s Network, it would be Wilder’s Ace In The Hole. It is a vigorously cogent work which has, rather unfortunately, stood the test of time. When it released back in 1951, it was received with lukewarm reviews and poor box-office returns. No wonder, for it was unlike all the movies Hollywood was churning out then. All like puppies wanted to be petted by everyone. Ace In The Hole takes a stand, abides by it and spurts out the truth in a right-in-your-face manner.

It shouts ‘We ourselves are the perpetrators of the crimes we accuse the media of. Where would be the demand if there was no one to sell to ?’ Maybe the world would be a hell of a better place if we took just a minute and really thought about that.

(When the movie released, the studios started charging the people to visit the sets. This movie is worth watching just to laugh at the irony of this fact)

RATING :-  9.4 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ginger & Rosa Review

Love is an irresistible desire to be irresistibly desired‘. These words of the great American poet, Robert Frost rings true for this 2012 movie from Sally Potter starring Elle Fanning and Alice Englert. The plot of this movie is concerned with a deteriorating friendship between the best friends Ginger and Rosa when the latter gets in a romantic relationship with the father of the primer.

Watching it ushers back memories from a 1962 French movie ‘Cleo From 5 To 7‘ in their uncanny representation of making love as an affirmation of life. Throughout the movie, Sally creates and nudges the audience repeatedly to comprehend the psychological brutality of the Cold War due to which the characters seem to be consciously adapting themselves to the finality of their lives, thus depriving themselves of the morality of their judgements.

The aspect of this wonderful movie that impressed me the most, and has gone unfortunately unnoticed to the public eye would be the underlying subtext to the dialogues. The scene in which Rosa comes out in open to Ginger about the nature of her relationship with Ginger’s father is breathtaking. The entire scene concerns itself with talks about the nuclear war and the Ten Commandments, however the underlying pathos is evident as anything can be.

One of the great accomplishments a drama can do is paint a story without a villain like A Separation. In a movie titled’ Ginger & Rosa’, Rosa seems vague in her actions as compared to the clear-cut emotional complexity of Ginger. As the movie progresses, Potter succumbs to the need to paint a character where the audience can corner their hate towards, and poor Rosa seems to be the scapegoat. When the movie ended, I was completely befuddled with Ginger’s acceptance of Rosa’s actions which to me seemed so vile in their nature.

Yet, there is so much to admire in this emotionally complex tale of friendship and love and existentialism that it stands out as a must-watch without a shimmer of doubt.

RATING :- 8.5 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes