Dunkirk Review

The moment the credits started rolling in Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk, a peremptory silence shrouds the theater. I walk out to find it is raining cats and dogs outside, but instead of reaching out for my umbrella, I saunter through the crowded streets. In this moment, I was aware of life happening all around me, a feeling as rare as they come. And there I understood the silence back in the theater. It was a moment of our gratefulness to the Almighty that we were alive, present in that moment. The last time I experienced such emotions was three years ago, when I watched a little movie called The Shawshank Redemption.

Dunkirk works on a three-level non-linear narrative structure which eventually comes together as a cohesive whole. What results because of this is probably one of the most thrilling experiences you will ever have at a cinema theater. Laden with a sense of urgency from the very first frame, the overall tension builds up with each passing scene, with great help from Hoyte Van Hoytema who has captured the finest war footage since Vittorio Storaro in Apocalypse Now. Frequent collaborator Hans Zimmer’s score is exhilarating, and the use of the ticking clock sound works wonders after some time, for it starts to sound like nails being bitten in the midst of this macabre.

The Dunkirk evacuation was a desperate cause, and this is a desperate movie. Almost all the characters in Dunkirk are anonymous, as if to not attract attention to the bravery of a selected few ignoring the whole picture. But this move worked on a psychological level for me as well. What if the reason why no one is named is because everyone knows each other ? Have they been stuck here for so long ?

Even though the questions about his greatness have drawn divisive responses, the veracity of the belief that Christopher Nolan is the greatest visionary to have graced cinema in 21st century is hors concours.With Dunkrik, he has crafted one of the great haunting visions of cinema which will be talked about in the same breath with works such as Aguirre. This is his ticket to the hall of the greats.

I went into it, expecting a character-driven emotional drama which Nolan’s work is characterized by. Never have I been more happy to be disappointed.

 

RATING :- 9.4 / 10

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes

My Thoughts On Pan’s Labyrinth

I have had my fair share of criticisms on this blog, most of them legitimate considering how maladroit my writing was in the early stages, but from the ones which hold ground even now, the one which perturbs me the most is my inconsistency. And if I say it’s because I don’t get enough time to watch movies and write about them, I would be lying because for the past couple of months, I have went through hundreds of them. Yet when I try to garner my thoughts on the majority of them, I find myself at a loss of words. I find myself in the same state John Green aptly described ‘My thoughts are stars I cannot fathom into constellations’. After much deliberation, I have come to the conclusion that I can only write about a movie when I either love it or hate it. No middle ground.

And here’s a diabolic gem from Guillermo Del Toro which reminds me why I picked up a pen consciously in the first place. I remember it was to write a short story about me saving Hermione Granger, my first literary and on-screen crush, from Death Eaters and in the end, getting to first base with her in the Room Of Requirement. As I look back upon it now, I find it to be an abhorrent work of both fantasy and erotica. But in it, I see something that was truly me at that time, a work which is truly original even though all its characters were not.

I believe that is why Pan’s Labyrinth is a masterpiece of its own league. After watching it, those same emotions which formed ranks and hurled themselves against the ramparts of my inhibitions a long time ago seemed to resurface with the same vigor. Its tale follows the soul of the princess of a distant past making her body of the present come in terms with her destiny in the midst of a macabre no child should hold witness to.

Unlike other fairy tales which shield even their evils in a graceful manner so as to not tarnish the minds of the young, Pan’s Labyrinth is as vile and violent and twisted as one can possibly imagine. The tales of the three tasks the protagonist Ofella has to undertake run in parallel with conflicts between Falangist soldiers and republican rebels, gradually morphing into one.

Del Toro excellently gives equal gravitas to both these tales, in a way in which we are invested in both and never out of touch in any. The creatures which inhabit the abhorrent worlds Del Toro crafts reek of creative genius, characters which are so familiar in their actions but so distinctive in their appearances that this movie turns out to be one of those rare works where one could happily watch with the sound turned off, just for the joy of how it looks.

I envy those who will watch this movie for the first time. And even more if they have just happened to hit the brink of puberty. The boundless imagination this movie will set free within them is the true magic which exists in this world. One which we all can hopefully find and believe in if we care to look for it a bit closely.

Always remember dear reader, no one ever grows old enough for fairy tales. In all my wisdom, I can say with unwavering confidence, that they seemingly grow old enough for their readers to love and learn.

RATING :- 9.5 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes

 

 

 

 

War Of The Planet Of The Apes Review

There couldn’t have been a more apt time for the War Of The Planet Of The Apes to have graced the silver screen. At a juncture where every big-budget movie seemed to be only style and no substance, War Of The Planet Of The Apes refreshes our memories of what the word ‘blockbuster’ once stood for. Made at the expense of one hundred and fifty million dollars, this third installment of the celebrated Planet of the Apes franchise proves with every single frame why it deserves every dollar of it.

The events follow the aftermath of the Koba mutiny which ensured a war between the apes and the Simian flu affected human beings. I won’t delve further into it for it needs to be experienced than told in my opinion. Rather I would like to scrutinize into the various odd aspects of it, some major and mostly minor in their scale, which I believe when summed up makes this movie what it is. And what it is, is a near fucking-masterpiece.

Let’s begin with a scene which occurs much later in the movie. The Colonel, a leader of a paramilitary organization, and Caesar, the leader of the apes, have a stand-off of sorts. In any other movie, I might have sighed with the exasperation of the  predictable nature of such scenarios in movies. But in War Of The Planet Of The Apes, I was nerve-wracked with tension on how it was going to play out. For these weren’t predictable characters whose actions bore by-the-book consequences. They were something truly original.

I believe everything in the movie up to the point mentioned above was a build-up to it, and the release was more than worth it. The artistic composition of this build-up can be written ceaselessly about, and the writing of this review is going to be an onerous struggle to end it, but that would be the last of the things to deter me.

The first ginormous excellence of War Of The Planet Of The Apes is its meditative pacing which gives ample time for character development. As the movie plays out, Caesar who has been seemingly omniscient for the larger part of this tale withers into a reflection of Koba himself. The plodding pace gives us time to reflect upon the previous events which have transpired, contemplate upon them and experience and reason on the transcendence of Caesar into darkness, bit by bit.

On the other hand, Woody Harrelson’s character is established and his ideologies construed in a single scene in which he delivers one of the most emotional monologues I can recount in cinematic history. The tension and the emotions of his words do not spring a constant release. Instead, they coil in on themselves creating an introspective mood for not only the Colonel, but Caesar himself.

The atmosphere of War Of The Planet Of The Apes is sullen, dark and extremely urgent, with the elements of nature seemingly closing in on themselves. The opening scene sprung memories of the colorful helmets the soldiers in Full Metal Jacket adorned, while the constructions of the concentration camps brings back memories of the Holocaust.

But, none of these stupendous achievements seem to hold weight when I think about what holds this masterpiece together. And all I can seemingly recount is Nova. She is a girl with a smile so beautiful that trying to describe it in the petty confines of language seems demeaning to its visceral beauty. Although one might assume in contrast, the entire movie lies on her shoulders, which she carries off in the same subtlety with which the girl in the red coat carried Schindler’s List.

Another stupendous scene is concerned with the discovery of an ape in hiding, high on emotions which cuts through the loneliness one is ridden with in such dark times. To sum it all up, which seems more and more a taxing endeavor with every word I am writing, a great sequel is the one which makes you appreciate even the flaws of its predecessor. War Of The Planet Of The Apes encapsulates that.

It is a movie about apes, but I am pretty darn sure that this masterpiece would be more or less the greatest ode to humanity that you would have the privilege of witnessing on the silver screen till the Times Square Ball drops in the near future.

RATING :- 9.5 / 10

(P.S.It would be a crime against the very notion of film-making if this work doesn’t get a Best Picture nod, Andy Serkis a Best Actor nod, and the various technical aspects nominations in their own respective categories)

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Come & See Review

I was scared of myself while watching Come & See. The characters in the movie look straight into the camera, with gazes and faces which will penetrate anyone’s heart, and run, amok with fear, as if the viewer himself is a devil they have come face to face with. It creates a ghastly atmosphere for the events set to unfold, which are an exploration into the evil which resides within all of us.

Almost all war movies maintain a zeal for self-censorship with respect to the audience. Come & See however keeps hold of its colossal power on its audience through the brutal violence it showcases, turning my living room into a battlefield in itself. It didn’t have shots fired all around it, but I could sense my living room being filled with all the emotions of the characters of Come & See, and to needlessly clarify, none of them are anything close to pleasant. The movie works as dissection of the human conditions during the World War II and all its despicable violence. It seems to encompass all of life itself, even paving a way for a lust-driven, yet heartfelt romance which we root for.

Albus Dumbeldore once said ‘Do not pity the dead, Harry. Pity the living and above all, those who live without love.’ There is a scene in this movie where hundreds of villagers are burnt alive in a woodshed. Their screams of anguish create immeasurable dread further accentuated by the laughs of the Nazis. Tears welled up in eyes not for the victims, but for the survivors. How can one ever witness such inhumanity and not lose faith in life ? Klimov begs us to feel sorry, not for the dead, but for the living who die with every passing second of their lives due to the indelible scars the violence which materialized has left on their minds. The ones who will be plagued the rest of their lives with nightmares of their dear and near ones getting burnt to death. The ones who will have to live their rest of their lives trying to forget those cries of anguish.

Come & See isn’t without its own share of faults. It is not devoid of melodrama at times, and in the end, a patriotic streak towards Russia. However, none of these flaws seem have any effect on the final turnout. That maybe because unlike other movies which act like puppies wanting to be petted by everyone, Come & See actually takes a stance. Fearlessly it proclaims what it actually thinks about the SS soldiers – Satan in a uniform.

RATING :- 9.3 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baahubali 2 – The Conclusion Review

Baahubali was a cultural standpoint in Indian cinema. In Indian cinema, full of washed up romantic musicals with old gags, the arrival of Baahubali blurred the lines of real and reel life – everyone was experiencing that same hope that the people of Mahistmati felt with the arrival of Mahendra Bahubali, the offspring of Amarendra Bahubali. The excitement for Baahubali 2 was quadrupled with the cliffhanger climax of the first installment and ‘Why did Kattapa kill Baahubali ?’ was the question hanging on everyone’s minds. And now we have the answer.

The dread that I carried in my mind since the release of the first installment unfortunately is now validated. The dread was that the sequel wouldn’t hold up. Everything about this movie is way over-the-top than it should have been, with the actions scenes reaching the limit of hilariousness. The action sequences of the first installment were original in terms of their choreography, however the ones in the second installment are repetitive, ridiculous and borrow heavily from Lord of The Rings- Two Towers.

The restraint that SS Rajamouli showed in Baahubali is completely missing in this work. The final work seems like the work of a toddler who was given all the crayons to paint a picture. Moreover, just painting characters as bound by their moral codes and drawing parallels to the epic Mahabharata so as to hide the shallowness of the central romance is just a very sleazy effort. The first installment was riveting, the second one is derisory.

Watching Baahubali 2 was seeing Murphy’s Law in action – everything that can go wrong did go wrong. But believe me, all fun is not lost. Go watch it with your friends, the ones who excel in sarcasm and rip every frame apart. Sitting alongside with me were a bunch of college kids who had bunked to watch this movie. Listening to their expletive-filled rants was the best time I had at the movies in recent memory. Unfortunately, I cannot say the same with respect to the movie. It sucked.

RATING : 4.5 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

Apocalypse Now Review

Apocalypse Now is loosely based on a book named ‘In The Heart Of Darkness’. Francis Ford Coppola in this 153 minute lacerating experience attempts one of the most ambitious and perilous endeavor in cinematic history – to transport his viewer right in the middle of the savagery which unfolded in Vietnam.

Apocalypse Now is more about the human mind rather than the war. It is easy to be fooled by this, since it does actively pursue its plot. But it is those abhorrent images which transpire on the screen that are the actual narrative. One could make the case, and to much success I presume, that Apocalypse Now has probably the greatest cinematic footage ever shot. The camera of Vittorio Storaro concots a pirouette of death all over. But even in the amidst of this violence, the screenplay by John Milius and Coppola still holds a spotlight over a bunch of characters towards whom we foster a sense of emotional attachment.

Coppola attempts to explore in Apocalypse Now, the concomitants of violence on the human mind. Take the scene with the Playboy bunnies which brings forth the animalistic libido fostered in men in continuous combat. However Coppola draws a line between the soldiers who fleet through this movie and the crew on board the boat. The crew that stays throughout this journey, a descendence from sanity to insanity, make an effort to preserve their humanity. There is an extremely heart-warming scene where Lance (Sam Bottom) takes on board a puppy which he finds in his ambush and takes care of it.

I have often come down hard on war movies while talking about them, and this maybe due to the fact of my personal beliefs that war holds no nobility or morality. Francois Truffaut once said ‘It’s not possible to make an anti-war movie, because all war movies, with their energy and sense of adventure, end up making combat look like fun’. However, Coppola seems to turn the tables on him, for the war here does look like fun, just not to the viewer.

Apocalypse Now belongs to the history books and it feels to me that whatever I talk about in praise of this movie will amount to nothing more than if I praise water. But sure as hell, I will never forget this movie. It held me spellbound and gaping at the violence that unfolds in war, and I couldn’t help but feel sorry for anyone who had to witness it. It is not an anti or pro war movie, but it sure is a pro-human movie.

RATING :- 9.5 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

Inglourious Basterds Review

Over the years he has been active, Quentin Tarantino has carved quite a niche for himself among the cinematic audience. These group of Tarantino lovers are unperturbed by the unbridled amount of gore or profanity in his movies, instead they seem to enjoy it like he does. And although my sentence formation may give the impression that I belong to the other group of cinematic audience, you are very mistaken. I love Quentin Tarantino’s work and this is one of his finest.

Inglourious Basterds is an affirmation to everything Quentin Tarantino’s film-making stands for: – sardonic humour in the midst of a parlous state of events. The reason why Quentin Tarantino is so loved is his unabashed, unafraid and unadulterated style of articulate those twisted tales he carries in that genius mind of his. The amount of violence may unnerve many, but then he or she hasn’t understood the mindset of Tarantino. I remember something Eminem said once ‘Anybody with a sense of humour is going to put on my album and laugh from beginning to end.‘ That’s how Tarantino goes about with his movies. He is a child toying with all the equipment he has in his hands. The violence is mere plain-old fun.

Tarantino reinvigorates his amazing ability to write the most marvellous and striking dialogues with Inglourious Basterds, even though a majority of it is in German or French. The most breath-taking scenes which result in nerve-wracking tension feature only individuals having long-drawn out yet undeniably interesting and completely out-of-context conversations. He unleashes the power dialogues guard so earnestly, which other screenplay writers seem to have forgotten. Take for example the opening scene where Christoph Waltz’s horrifying character Hans Landa, who will go down in history as one of cinema’s great villains, has a conversation with a dairy farmer who is hiding a Jewish family. The conversation is about how squirrel and rats are both rodents, but yet we treat squirrels with hospitality and rats with hostility, and one split second later, the tone of conversations changes completely to utter horror. Obviously, much credits in bringing about the fruitfulness of such great dialogue-writing goes to actors who transform these written words to verbal medium on screen, but here one can make the case that it is the director who orchestrates these sequences, which appears to be Tarantino as well. Here’s a man who makes movies as if they are worth dying for.

Roger Ebert once said ‘No good movie is long enough’ That was the first thing that came to my mind after watching this movie. Even at a length of two and a half-hours, Inglourious Basterds does not have only single dull moment in it (much credits to editor Sally Menke for that). Inglorious Basterds is Tarantino at his best. Thank God for him. The world needs more fim-makers like him, who know how to make movies with infectious energy which grabs hold of audiences without lowering the I.Q. of the cinema hall.

RATING :- 9 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.