Phantom Thread Review

Paul Thomas Anderson’s Phantom Thread treads through the murkiest waters of morality, and it does so in the full etiquette of its world. Its primary strength lies in the way the tension is handled throughout, in how it builds suspense even if it seems be to be telling us everything we want to know. The emotional bedlam that ensues gradually is the beating heart of the movie, yet its pounding is suppressed in mere whispers as if it to be a nugatory underlining, which causes it to coil inwards. The effect that betides is that every passing frame starts to take on the form of a ticking bomb, due to explode at the slightest misunderstood utterance. So even when nothing remotely wrong is happening in a scene, everything else seems to suggest the very contrary.

This is the textbook example of a director with an unyielding mastery of his craft working here at the top of his form. Consider how Anderson tackles the primary elements of sensuality and tension that emulsify to form the base of Phantom Thread. Rather than the bountiful skin-show that the naïve would have resorted to, Anderson never strays from the suppressed tonality of the world he concocts, choosing to rather resort to the very essence of physical attraction which is the total mobilization of the senses. Lewis and Krieps observe each other intently, scrutinizing every grimace and roll of the eyes and straining to catch every sound of the other. The tension is educed from the subtle lingering between lines and scenes, with this delayed transition giving way for silence to strikingly meander which is then filled henceforth by the mood of the movie, which as aforementioned, never runs for a second without a tinge of tension.

Parts of the movie center themselves on the physical process of the creation of art. The measurements, the tapes and the threads are all unravelled before us, shown here in great detail. Then, a duly focus and patience is given to the very creation of a dress, from the inception circling around the designing process and coming to a denouement with the material fruition. I know all of this sounds pretty boring. Believe me; it is more thrilling than a car chase.

Herein, I also wish to bring attention towards the scrupulous sound mixing which otherwise runs the risk of going unappreciated. So, it is said that artistic processes take place on the right side of the brain, the side that is liberated from the mundane considerations of the verbal left side. Whenever Reynolds gets engrossed in the creative process, Adrian Bell & John Midgley (the sound mixers) draw out all the brouhaha of the external world and immerse us in the world that is Reynolds’ mind. And whenever the external world is perceived from Reynolds’ point of view, every monoscopic sound is incorporated to let the viewer comprehend the incertitude of the relationship between the creative and the external.

The chunk of the runtime deals with shifting power dynamics within Reynolds, Cyril and Alma. Both Cyril and Alma are strong and Reynolds is weak and both want him to feed off their kindness. Alma however fears that Reynolds sees here merely as an object, while Cyril knows that Reynolds sees not Alma’s outside, but the insides. Reynolds is left in a state of stupefaction between this shifting power dynamics dubiety, and in the midst of all this, Anderson subtly masks the crux over which he weaves the entire movie around – the relationship between Reynolds and his mother. The notion of love, dear reader, is a strange paradox. As the fictional philosopher Richard Levy puts it in Allen’s Crimes & Misdemeanours ‘The paradox consists of the fact that when we fall in love we are seeking to refind all or some of the people to whom we were attached as children. On the other hand, we ask of our beloved to correct all of the wrongs that these early parents or siblings inflicted on us. So that love contains in it a contradiction, the attempt to return to the past and the attempt to undo the past’. As we can infer from the sparse information that Anderson treats us to, Reynolds life seems to be a mere continuation of his mother’s, much as the course of a ball on the billboard table is merely the continuation of the player’s arm movement. In the midst of the women in his life, Reynolds intently becomes weak and infirm, so as to compensate in their affection the tutelage from his mother for which he was never privy to. Or is the other way round?

I haven’t the faintest idea, and Phantom Thread isn’t a movie that gives answers. When Anderson pulls the rug out from under Phantom Thread, it raises even more questions. To try to answer them is to miss the point. These are ambiguities which are meant to get under your skin and stay there.

There will be detractors of course, as there should be. But do ignore the ones which say ‘nothing happens’ in the movie. I say so because whether you like it or not, it is indubitable that ‘so much is happening’ beneath what we see. As Milan Kundera once succinctly put it ‘On the surface, an intelligible lie; underneath, the unintelligible truth’.

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The Post Review

“If freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter.”

These where the words of George Augustine Washington, a president so beloved that after his second term, the crowds supplicated for a third.  He was succeeded 36 terms later by a man whose words where ‘When the president does it, it means that it is not illegal‘. Richard Milhous Nixon was a weed in the garden of democracy, and The Post is about those who decided it was about time to uproot him from there.

Unlike All The President’s Men by Alan Pakula (a masterpiece with which unfair comparisons are bound to crop up, thematically and artistically), Spielberg’s vision doesn’t scrutinize the method of the investigation. There is no cross checking of directories or following up on those allocation of funds (which always seem to end up in shell companies by the way) or anything remotely of that sort. What it does is play itself out like a morality play, from which we learn how journalists should behave.

The plot seemingly runs on two parallels for most of the run time, resulting both in the jarring effect the first half exudes and the power the second half emanates. One of them circles around Ben Bradlee, the executive editor of Washington Post whose journalistic sagacity and an anomalous active interest in the affairs of other newspapers has lead him to cognize that something extremely pivotal is set to materialize in the political scenario, something that may just be the turnaround for the shabby state of Washington Post at that time if they happen to get their hands on it. The second plot thread follows Kay Graham, the owner of Washington Post who has enough troubles on her mind even without the Pentagon papers, since the company is going public and the shareholders seem to have a wavered confidence in her capabilities to lead it. Making the affairs further complex is that Kay has personal relations with the parties whose lives and careers will be rocked beyond repairs if the papers go into print. And in the midst of all this bedlam, the truth awaits patiently to be shone light upon.

The quandaries I had with the movie are quite sparse, yet it would be helpful to jot them right here, considering my inherent vice to dabble in the concluding paragraphs to exhibit my own personal views and in the way forgetting to play the role of a ‘critic’. The very first of them (and seemingly, the last of them) is a non harmonious flow of affairs that commences with the two story lines running on different platitudes, with almost nothing expect the similar crop of faces creating a link between the two. Does it accentuate the the climax you may ask, and yes will I say, but in my book, the ends do not justify the means when it comes to movies at least and a natural proclivity for the Pentagon papers rather than the stockholders’ meetings renders the Graham thread insipid in some parts.

What it does right is that it establishes character. We are acclimatized to their demeanor and their fears so succinctly, that we chalk up our own character arcs in our minds on how they will respond to a certain situation. And herein Spielberg plays a masterstroke :- he lets us believe we are right about them. Streep, giving one of her greatest performances on film, seems suffocated by her societal shackles which delude her from working for the interests of her enterprise, and Hanks’ plays the newspaper man with such finesse that it is hard to suspect whether all he cares about is something that sells or the hard hitting truth. We know who these people are, and that is where in the final 30 minutes when things start going haywire, we realize we couldn’t have known less about them.

What it does right is that it establishes the stage perfectly for what facet of the story it wanted to explore. By maintaining a duly curb on the investigation process, the wayward shift from the newsroom to the nation wide debate that ensues about freedom of press seems like a naturalistic transition rather than capitalizing on the present skewed political scenario from where it gleans its relevance from.

Dear reader, truth does set us free, but first it pisses us off. The Post is about a select few who were pissed, and wanted others to be as well. The scenes where the journalists huddle in silence, or when the printing machines hum to life to prepare the ‘first rough drafts of history’ as the movie puts it or where the Watergate fiasco comes to life happen to be the most powerful. It is because what we are seeing is the truth coming to life, and as human beings, it resonates with the conscience of one and all. From the facade of lies that liars like Nixon weave to delude is, it is these journalists who save us from time to time, not so much by the rectitude of Grahams as by the dogged curiosity of Bens. Those who view The Post just as a statement on the current shabby affairs of politics is missing the cohesive whole. Sure, it asks us, have all the men who succeeded George Washington to that chair been half-worthy of it ? But it also subtly asks, would you be so invigorated if the film playing was a feed from any newsroom of today ?

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes

Punyalan Private Limited Review

 I don’t film messages. I let the post office take care of those – Bernardo Bertolucci 

One of the many legit complaints I receive about this little blog of mine is my nonchalant attitude towards contributing in it. One of the major reasons for this (except my ever prevalent writer’s block of course) is that I can only write about a movie once , and most of the movies which hit the theaters are the same movie being made and remade again and again with a different cast and settings to mask this fact up. Punyalan Private Limited is another addition to this array of films, an exercise in borderline mediocrity which crusades as the public opinion to redeem itself. Unfortunately, it takes only the opening five minutes to see through the act.

When Punyalan Agarbattis hit the theaters four years ago, my admiration for it was, and still is apodictic. It wasn’t a movie trying to be anything except than the tale it was telling, and in doing so, spoke for everyone who was watching it. On the other hand, this sequel is like a puppy wanting to be petted by everyone. Movies, just like people, end up being only what they truly are at the end, and what Punyalan Private Limited is at the end of the day is just a vehicle scampering on the last residues of glory its predecessor amassed and its viewer’s miserable existence.

And that last part is my major issue with this movie. Every scene feels tailor made to make space for a mass dialogue which feeds right into the hate accumulated in the viewer’s heart towards the system. It’s not just the exploitation of the viewer’s insecurities that bothers me, it is of the character’s as well. If characters are mere caricatures to get a point across, how could one possibly relate with them ? Jayasurya is fabulous in his role, yet do we know anything more about his character when this movie ends than we knew from before it began ? For all you know, I could have played the rest of the characters in this movie and it still wouldn’t make a difference. And I happen to be a terrible actor.

Whatever it sets out to do, it crashes egregiously at. Yet, there is an underlying sense of irony that the movie which sets out to proclaim everything wrong with the system ends up being everything that is wrong with the medium which it has chosen to explore. This brand of cinema is not entertainment, it is spoon-feeding, giving the audiences what they want, when they want it and dumbing their taste to utter mediocrity. Punyalan Private Limited says all that the common man of India (me included) would like to say about the fallacies of the system. But think about it, isn’t paying to hear what we say to ourselves everyday a really stupid deal ?

RATING :- 4 / 10

 

 

Blade Runner 2049 Review

With a movie so much about memories at hand, I would deem it the most inappropriate to not let you, dear reader, to not partake in one of mine while we are talking about it. While I was six of age, I was standing in a line to get my book checked by my English teacher. In front of me was a girl, and by God, she was the most beautiful thing I had laid eyes on till then. Quite unacquainted in these quandaries (as I should have been at six, and unfortunately, as I still am), I took the approach which had been tried and tested and had the indelible approval of Bollywood on it – I dropped my books. And guess what ? Cliches exist for a reason. She did bend down and help me pick up those worthless books ! I thanked her and smiled, and the motion was duly reciprocated. I introduced myself and so did she, and that was all that took for me to fall in love with her. And then ? Nothing. I never could muster the courage nor an approach to use it for, and as it always does, life happened. A decade later, she has shifted to far away, has a boyfriend and as far as I know, is quite happy with him, and I, well, I am talking movies to y’all. Over the years, I have revisited this above memory now and then, or to put it more correctly, this memory has revisited me now and then. For all the disappointment it holds, I still treasure it for the singular perfection is seemed to hold and the promise of much more. But more than that, it is that feeling of it which transcends words, so rare as if in the likeness of one of those misty halos that sometimes are made visible by spectral illumination of moonshine. This memory is what K (Ryan Gosling) would have died for, for in all its messiness, it is still as profound as the sound of bells in a Christian county. All that pain is all there is to be human.

With a pace reminiscent of a river eroding a rock, 2049 is beauty in the midst of all imperfections. It is a hybrid of science fiction, film noir, detective thriller, bounty hunter, western and a love story, that is to say it hasn’t strayed a bit from its origins. I could never write a proper review for the predecessor, instead resorting to hide my inadequacy in a mishmash study of its groundbreaking world with that of Cuaron’s Children of Men. So it comes off as no surprise that I can’t write a proper one for the sequel as well, yet for wholly different reasons. In the original Blade Runner, it was the imperfections that drew me in. I have rarely revisited it for its heartbreaking climax or for the ambiguity on whether Deckard is a replicant or not. No, more often than not, I find myself switching off my sound system when I watch Blade Runner and just let that eclectic visual style wash over me.

The towering skyscrapers of  2049 strain upward, gasping for air through the polluted skies. Sinister alleys and dark, cavelike crannies conceal unspeakable crimes against humanity. Nature has gone berserk, deluging the teeming city with an almost constant downpour. Smoke, steam and fog add to the fumigated congestion. It is a city of dreadful night, punctuated by neon signs in day-glo colors, cheap Orientalized billboards and a profusion of advertising come-ons with hunks of long-discarded machinery littering the landscape. The music by Zimmer provides no relief from the oppressive gloom, throbbing with eerie sounds, echoes, pounding pistons and the noises of flying vehicles shuttling through the poisonous atmosphere. Yet, through the eyes of the great Roger Deakins, the settings can be sinister and terrifying, or strikingly beautiful like an enchanted landscape depending upon the character focused on.

Denis Villeneuve, who has ascended to the ranks of Hollywood elite in a sparse amount of years, has incited criticisms for a number of reasons but character development has never been one of them. The love story, unlike its predecessor, stays with you, deeply involving us in the struggle of these lovers to feel love. When the Deckard angle enters, it does not feel like a forced attempt to cash in on the nostalgia of the original but rather to relieve it, and even better, comprehend it a bit more.

But the question here, and I am sure you are rather impatient about it by now, is whether it is as good as the original or not ? Objectively, no. Subjectively, yes. And this is because ignoring all the faults I singled out, which are too technical and boring to jot down here, I find a reflection of me in these characters longing to love yet finding no one to. I am not too sure to advertise my opinion since it is too fickle, but it is what it is and that is all I can manage to get onto a paper as well. Well, I guess I am only human.

But regardless of whether my judgement is a fallacy or not, go to the biggest screen you can find and experience 2049. Whether you like to admit it or not, the return of the world of Philip Dick to the screen is not just another movie, it is a cinematic event. So recline in your seat, forgetting the overblown air conditioning, that annoying couple getting to second base behind and the ever meddling Censor Board. Recline a bit more and let the lights, the sound and the emotions wash over you, and find yourself in the midst of the city choking on its own technology.

Personally speaking, as I always am, 2049 is everything I have wanted science fiction to be :- universal in its scope and personal in appeal.

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

Photo Rights : Google Images, Wikipedia

Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dunkirk Review

The moment the credits started rolling in Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk, a peremptory silence shrouds the theater. I walk out to find it is raining cats and dogs outside, but instead of reaching out for my umbrella, I saunter through the crowded streets. In this moment, I was aware of life happening all around me, a feeling as rare as they come. And there I understood the silence back in the theater. It was a moment of our gratefulness to the Almighty that we were alive, present in that moment. The last time I experienced such emotions was three years ago, when I watched a little movie called The Shawshank Redemption.

Dunkirk works on a three-level non-linear narrative structure which eventually comes together as a cohesive whole. What results because of this is probably one of the most thrilling experiences you will ever have at a cinema theater. Laden with a sense of urgency from the very first frame, the overall tension builds up with each passing scene, with great help from Hoyte Van Hoytema who has captured the finest war footage since Vittorio Storaro in Apocalypse Now. Frequent collaborator Hans Zimmer’s score is exhilarating, and the use of the ticking clock sound works wonders after some time, for it starts to sound like nails being bitten in the midst of this macabre.

The Dunkirk evacuation was a desperate cause, and this is a desperate movie. Almost all the characters in Dunkirk are anonymous, as if to not attract attention to the bravery of a selected few ignoring the whole picture. But this move worked on a psychological level for me as well. What if the reason why no one is named is because everyone knows each other ? Have they been stuck here for so long ?

Even though the questions about his greatness have drawn divisive responses, the veracity of the belief that Christopher Nolan is the greatest visionary to have graced cinema in 21st century is hors concours.With Dunkrik, he has crafted one of the great haunting visions of cinema which will be talked about in the same breath with works such as Aguirre. This is his ticket to the hall of the greats.

I went into it, expecting a character-driven emotional drama which Nolan’s work is characterized by. Never have I been more happy to be disappointed.

 

RATING :- 9.4 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes

War Of The Planet Of The Apes Review

There couldn’t have been a more apt time for the War Of The Planet Of The Apes to have graced the silver screen. At a juncture where every big-budget movie seemed to be only style and no substance, War Of The Planet Of The Apes refreshes our memories of what the word ‘blockbuster’ once stood for. Made at the expense of one hundred and fifty million dollars, this third installment of the celebrated Planet of the Apes franchise proves with every single frame why it deserves every dollar of it.

The events follow the aftermath of the Koba mutiny which ensured a war between the apes and the Simian flu affected human beings. I won’t delve further into it for it needs to be experienced than told in my opinion. Rather I would like to scrutinize into the various odd aspects of it, some major and mostly minor in their scale, which I believe when summed up makes this movie what it is. And what it is, is a near fucking-masterpiece.

Let’s begin with a scene which occurs much later in the movie. The Colonel, a leader of a paramilitary organization, and Caesar, the leader of the apes, have a stand-off of sorts. In any other movie, I might have sighed with the exasperation of the  predictable nature of such scenarios in movies. But in War Of The Planet Of The Apes, I was nerve-wracked with tension on how it was going to play out. For these weren’t predictable characters whose actions bore by-the-book consequences. They were something truly original.

I believe everything in the movie up to the point mentioned above was a build-up to it, and the release was more than worth it. The artistic composition of this build-up can be written ceaselessly about, and the writing of this review is going to be an onerous struggle to end it, but that would be the last of the things to deter me.

The first ginormous excellence of War Of The Planet Of The Apes is its meditative pacing which gives ample time for character development. As the movie plays out, Caesar who has been seemingly omniscient for the larger part of this tale withers into a reflection of Koba himself. The plodding pace gives us time to reflect upon the previous events which have transpired, contemplate upon them and experience and reason on the transcendence of Caesar into darkness, bit by bit.

On the other hand, Woody Harrelson’s character is established and his ideologies construed in a single scene in which he delivers one of the most emotional monologues I can recount in cinematic history. The tension and the emotions of his words do not spring a constant release. Instead, they coil in on themselves creating an introspective mood for not only the Colonel, but Caesar himself.

The atmosphere of War Of The Planet Of The Apes is sullen, dark and extremely urgent, with the elements of nature seemingly closing in on themselves. The opening scene sprung memories of the colorful helmets the soldiers in Full Metal Jacket adorned, while the constructions of the concentration camps brings back memories of the Holocaust.

But, none of these stupendous achievements seem to hold weight when I think about what holds this masterpiece together. And all I can seemingly recount is Nova. She is a girl with a smile so beautiful that trying to describe it in the petty confines of language seems demeaning to its visceral beauty. Although one might assume in contrast, the entire movie lies on her shoulders, which she carries off in the same subtlety with which the girl in the red coat carried Schindler’s List.

Another stupendous scene is concerned with the discovery of an ape in hiding, high on emotions which cuts through the loneliness one is ridden with in such dark times. To sum it all up, which seems more and more a taxing endeavor with every word I am writing, a great sequel is the one which makes you appreciate even the flaws of its predecessor. War Of The Planet Of The Apes encapsulates that.

It is a movie about apes, but I am pretty darn sure that this masterpiece would be more or less the greatest ode to humanity that you would have the privilege of witnessing on the silver screen till the Times Square Ball drops in the near future.

RATING :- 9.5 / 10

(P.S.It would be a crime against the very notion of film-making if this work doesn’t get a Best Picture nod, Andy Serkis a Best Actor nod, and the various technical aspects nominations in their own respective categories)

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

Photo Rights : Google Images, Wikipedia

Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sachin – A Billion Dreams Review

On the second of April in the year 2011, I (like billion others) was glued to the television screen in my friend’s house. The consistency with which Jayawardene was belting out boundaries was draining us all bit by bit of any hope that this wait of 28 years would finally come to an end. 274 runs were put on board by the visitors, a target imposing in nature even in a normal one-day international, forget in a World Cup final. If India was to lay hands on the World Cup, Sri Lanka had ensured it would be only after the biggest run chase in World Cup final history. After the fall of the Nawab of Najafgarh, the hope of 1.311 billion people took the crease. And after a straight-drive which I to date consider the greatest played in the history of cricket, Tendulkar departed from the crease due to an edge which was held on to by the masterful hands of Kumar Sangakarra. At this moment, my friend switched off the television.

Such was the influence of Tendulkar. For masses all over, Tendulkar encapsulated the entire batting lineup. His wicket meant the downfall of the entire team. The fact that my own personal favourite player and captain of the Indian team, Mahendra Singh Dhoni took the Indian team home is another story. But, this trivial incident seems to be the memory that stands out whenever I recount that eventful day.

This beautiful nation I live in is in itself a rags-to-riches story. From reeling under extreme poverty, India has taken gargantuan steps to consolidate its position as a considerable force in international politics. However, there was a need to stand out. We were developing for sure, but never in the forefront of anything. That is where Tendulkar came in. His rise to the numero uno position coincided with India’s development, turning his career into a prismatic view of India itself. Harsha Bhogle rightly states ‘He stood for everything India stood for – humbleness, a respect towards elders and a zeal to be the greatest. In him, everyone saw their hopes and that they too can come true’.

Never in my life have I ever seen an audience sit through the ending credits of a movie. But, when I went to watch Billion Dreams, every audience member had his eyes glued to the screen till the credits ended. That is because Sachin – A Billion Dreams is not just a movie, it was an experience. In the footage of his last match, a fan is seen holding a board which says ‘ I wish I could have had a time machine just to go back to the 15th of November, 1989’. For the time this movie was projected in the cinema hall, every single one of us in that room had time spiraled back for us, our hearts beating for Sachin again. I won’t give a rating at the end of this, because I give ratings to movies, not experiences.

There few sportsmen that stand out. A handful that define an era, if they are lucky. Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar at the end of his career had ended up defining an entire sport.

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