War Of The Planet Of The Apes Review

There couldn’t have been a more apt time for the War Of The Planet Of The Apes to have graced the silver screen. At a juncture where every big-budget movie seemed to be only style and no substance, War Of The Planet Of The Apes refreshes our memories of what the word ‘blockbuster’ once stood for. Made at the expense of one hundred and fifty million dollars, this third installment of the celebrated Planet of the Apes franchise proves with every single frame why it deserves every dollar of it.

The events follow the aftermath of the Koba mutiny which ensured a war between the apes and the Simian flu affected human beings. I won’t delve further into it for it needs to be experienced than told in my opinion. Rather I would like to scrutinize into the various odd aspects of it, some major and mostly minor in their scale, which I believe when summed up makes this movie what it is. And what it is, is a near fucking-masterpiece.

Let’s begin with a scene which occurs much later in the movie. The Colonel, a leader of a paramilitary organization, and Caesar, the leader of the apes, have a stand-off of sorts. In any other movie, I might have sighed with the exasperation of the  predictable nature of such scenarios in movies. But in War Of The Planet Of The Apes, I was nerve-wracked with tension on how it was going to play out. For these weren’t predictable characters whose actions bore by-the-book consequences. They were something truly original.

I believe everything in the movie up to the point mentioned above was a build-up to it, and the release was more than worth it. The artistic composition of this build-up can be written ceaselessly about, and the writing of this review is going to be an onerous struggle to end it, but that would be the last of the things to deter me.

The first ginormous excellence of War Of The Planet Of The Apes is its meditative pacing which gives ample time for character development. As the movie plays out, Caesar who has been seemingly omniscient for the larger part of this tale withers into a reflection of Koba himself. The plodding pace gives us time to reflect upon the previous events which have transpired, contemplate upon them and experience and reason on the transcendence of Caesar into darkness, bit by bit.

On the other hand, Woody Harrelson’s character is established and his ideologies construed in a single scene in which he delivers one of the most emotional monologues I can recount in cinematic history. The tension and the emotions of his words do not spring a constant release. Instead, they coil in on themselves creating an introspective mood for not only the Colonel, but Caesar himself.

The atmosphere of War Of The Planet Of The Apes is sullen, dark and extremely urgent, with the elements of nature seemingly closing in on themselves. The opening scene sprung memories of the colorful helmets the soldiers in Full Metal Jacket adorned, while the constructions of the concentration camps brings back memories of the Holocaust.

But, none of these stupendous achievements seem to hold weight when I think about what holds this masterpiece together. And all I can seemingly recount is Nova. She is a girl with a smile so beautiful that trying to describe it in the petty confines of language seems demeaning to its visceral beauty. Although one might assume in contrast, the entire movie lies on her shoulders, which she carries off in the same subtlety with which the girl in the red coat carried Schindler’s List.

Another stupendous scene is concerned with the discovery of an ape in hiding, high on emotions which cuts through the loneliness one is ridden with in such dark times. To sum it all up, which seems more and more a taxing endeavor with every word I am writing, a great sequel is the one which makes you appreciate even the flaws of its predecessor. War Of The Planet Of The Apes encapsulates that.

It is a movie about apes, but I am pretty darn sure that this masterpiece would be more or less the greatest ode to humanity that you would have the privilege of witnessing on the silver screen till the Times Square Ball drops in the near future.

RATING :- 9.5 / 10

(P.S.It would be a crime against the very notion of film-making if this work doesn’t get a Best Picture nod, Andy Serkis a Best Actor nod, and the various technical aspects nominations in their own respective categories)

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sachin – A Billion Dreams Review

On the second of April in the year 2011, I (like billion others) was glued to the television screen in my friend’s house. The consistency with which Jayawardene was belting out boundaries was draining us all bit by bit of any hope that this wait of 28 years would finally come to an end. 274 runs were put on board by the visitors, a target imposing in nature even in a normal one-day international, forget in a World Cup final. If India was to lay hands on the World Cup, Sri Lanka had ensured it would be only after the biggest run chase in World Cup final history. After the fall of the Nawab of Najafgarh, the hope of 1.311 billion people took the crease. And after a straight-drive which I to date consider the greatest played in the history of cricket, Tendulkar departed from the crease due to an edge which was held on to by the masterful hands of Kumar Sangakarra. At this moment, my friend switched off the television.

Such was the influence of Tendulkar. For masses all over, Tendulkar encapsulated the entire batting lineup. His wicket meant the downfall of the entire team. The fact that my own personal favourite player and captain of the Indian team, Mahendra Singh Dhoni took the Indian team home is another story. But, this trivial incident seems to be the memory that stands out whenever I recount that eventful day.

This beautiful nation I live in is in itself a rags-to-riches story. From reeling under extreme poverty, India has taken gargantuan steps to consolidate its position as a considerable force in international politics. However, there was a need to stand out. We were developing for sure, but never in the forefront of anything. That is where Tendulkar came in. His rise to the numero uno position coincided with India’s development, turning his career into a prismatic view of India itself. Harsha Bhogle rightly states ‘He stood for everything India stood for – humbleness, a respect towards elders and a zeal to be the greatest. In him, everyone saw their hopes and that they too can come true’.

Never in my life have I ever seen an audience sit through the ending credits of a movie. But, when I went to watch Billion Dreams, every audience member had his eyes glued to the screen till the credits ended. That is because Sachin – A Billion Dreams is not just a movie, it was an experience. In the footage of his last match, a fan is seen holding a board which says ‘ I wish I could have had a time machine just to go back to the 15th of November, 1989’. For the time this movie was projected in the cinema hall, every single one of us in that room had time spiraled back for us, our hearts beating for Sachin again. I won’t give a rating at the end of this, because I give ratings to movies, not experiences.

There few sportsmen that stand out. A handful that define an era, if they are lucky. Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar at the end of his career had ended up defining an entire sport.

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guardians of the Galaxy – Volume II Review

When Guardians of the Galaxy hit the theaters in 2014, I hailed it as the superhero movie Quentin Tarantino would have made because of its ultra-cool quotient. The second installment in the series however diverges from its predecessor and is laden with emotional overtones. The plot is concerned with the questions that baffled us all in the climax of the first installment :- Who is Star Lord’s father ? How was he able to hold onto the Infinity Stone ?

And it does a good job in answering them. When I think about it, I think I couldn’t have asked for a better sequel for this series. The movie delves into what makes it so much more endearing as compared to The Avengers, the emotional core of these groups of misfits. Here they are, with all their layers peeled off, completely emotionally naked before the viewer.

The character who I believe deserves a special mention is Rocket Raccoon. He may probably be one of the most original characters to have graced the silver screen in the 21st century. His cocky attitude, his pugnacious one-liners held me spell-binded. The fact that he is so darn cute doesn’t hurt as well.

The few nodus in this movie would be foremost the eagerness of James Gunn to revive the same magic and style of the prequel. Even though completely different in terms of their style, one being unabashedly cool and the other emotional, Gunn attempts to load the narrative with gags which eventually start wearing off. Also, the prequel had left a pretty high bar for the soundtrack section which in my opinion it fails to live up to except for Father & Son by Cat Stevens, which adorns a beautiful emotional ending .

To sum it, Guardians of the Galaxy – Volume 2 is a hell lot of fun, with well-fleshed out characters and a surprisingly moving story arc. It is a sequel which in more ways than one lives up to its smashing predecessor, and is a great addition to this space-western saga.

RATING : – 8 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes

 

 

Baahubali 2 – The Conclusion Review

Baahubali was a cultural standpoint in Indian cinema. In Indian cinema, full of washed up romantic musicals with old gags, the arrival of Baahubali blurred the lines of real and reel life – everyone was experiencing that same hope that the people of Mahistmati felt with the arrival of Mahendra Bahubali, the offspring of Amarendra Bahubali. The excitement for Baahubali 2 was quadrupled with the cliffhanger climax of the first installment and ‘Why did Kattapa kill Baahubali ?’ was the question hanging on everyone’s minds. And now we have the answer.

The dread that I carried in my mind since the release of the first installment unfortunately is now validated. The dread was that the sequel wouldn’t hold up. Everything about this movie is way over-the-top than it should have been, with the actions scenes reaching the limit of hilariousness. The action sequences of the first installment were original in terms of their choreography, however the ones in the second installment are repetitive, ridiculous and borrow heavily from Lord of The Rings- Two Towers.

The restraint that SS Rajamouli showed in Baahubali is completely missing in this work. The final work seems like the work of a toddler who was given all the crayons to paint a picture. Moreover, just painting characters as bound by their moral codes and drawing parallels to the epic Mahabharata so as to hide the shallowness of the central romance is just a very sleazy effort. The first installment was riveting, the second one is derisory.

Watching Baahubali 2 was seeing Murphy’s Law in action – everything that can go wrong did go wrong. But believe me, all fun is not lost. Go watch it with your friends, the ones who excel in sarcasm and rip every frame apart. Sitting alongside with me were a bunch of college kids who had bunked to watch this movie. Listening to their expletive-filled rants was the best time I had at the movies in recent memory. Unfortunately, I cannot say the same with respect to the movie. It sucked.

RATING : 4.5 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

Noor Review

To appeal to the young-audiences who fill up most of the seats for any film up for release (for getting selfies in those seats with their dates is another reality), mainstream Bollywood has been diverting its focus towards making youth-oriented cinema. Since the release of Shuddh Desi Romance in 2013, which paved the way for characters who are emotionally and sexually liberated, many movies have followed the suit and Noor is one of them. Unfortunately, this effort to break the shackles of a formulaic plots has also resulted in a formula and Noor falls an unfortunate prey to that.

It’s major quandary is an inability to surf from comic to tragic elements. Dramedys take a huge risk for they are two movies emulsified into one, and more often that not they come off as phony, which is what Noor feels like throughout its run-time. Predictability is a curse of cinema, and Noor is jinxed with it. It adopts a Ferris Bueller’s Day Off structure, yet has none of the charm it exuded. When will screenplay writers understand that comedy isn’t witty one-liners wrote off as dialogues ? There needs to be scenarios created so as to make these dialogues effective as well and Noor lacks them in ginormous amounts.

The other quandary is its take on journalistic integrity. It takes shares and retweets on social media as a scale to measure the popularity of a news item. And believe me, there is even a one minute scene where all that flashes on the scene is a number of hashtags, status updates and like counter. I can’t imagine how a film-maker even thought in his wildest dreams that this is not cringe-worthy. The film for some inexplicable reason tries to accommodate the entire life of its character in a bunch of hashtags. In a world where even someone saying ‘Damn Daniel’ repeatedly gets viral, I have rights to assert that social media is the least of all mediums to be used to illustrate the impact of a news item.

However, even in the midst of all this ruckus, Sonakshi Sinha stands tall. This movie really did not deserve this amazing performance.The few chuckles I garnered was for the odd charm she brought into the character with her adorable mannerisms. I have high regard for her and I wish she does more of such phenomenal work, however with better scripts. Kanan Gill is fabulous as the comedic and emotional relief, and the movie does an excellent work in exploring the romantic undertones of their relationship with a gradual pace.

Maybe the reason why I am writing so despondently about this movie is I expected more. I walked into this movie actually holding high hopes, and except for the performances and cinematography, I was let down. I would however recommend you to give it a go without holding high hopes. Maybe you might love it as much as I loved Sinha’s performance. You can walk into the cinema hall just to watch her, and it still wouldn’t be a waste of hard-earned money.

RATING : 5.5 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.