Cache Review

What if someone is watching and documenting every day of your life ? That is the question Haneke poses through this slow-paced exercise of watching the troubles which commence when a family discovers that someone is taping the exterior of their house and even private conversations, every single day.

Haneke weaves a web of lies and flashbacks around us which leaves us transfixed towards the screen throughout the movie, without any regard to its slow-pacing. The monotonousness of the composition of the shots establishes an everlasting dread about the nature of the events that transpire in front of us. Is this a tape or is this really happening ? The non presence of a background score further accentuates the tension of the movie.

Much credit for the brutal realism of this movie goes to the brilliant performances. Daniel Auteuil appears as an enigma wrapped in a mystery. Juliette Binoche’s beauty and acting is a work of nature, and her performance here further builds up my case of her being one of the greatest actresses of all time.

What Haneke demands us to introspect is that even the most respectful of human beings have skeletons in their closet. The characters in Cache have nothing to hide, yet when these seemingly harmless tapes surface, they do fear. Of the horrors of the past we leave behind with no trail to link them back to us, those horrors we pretend to forget about and lead a normal life. Yet, there is no denial that they haunt every human being and the characters in Cache are no exceptions. The tapes are just the stimulus and hold no value.

Yet, where it succeeds as a drama, Cache fails as a mystery. If you had no knowledge about its end, I inform you that it is an incomplete one. It leaves you the job to draw out the conclusions based on the information given. To be honest to you, I was enraged by this, for I don’t know what else qualifies as artistic fraud. A movie justifies its ending. In a movie like Inception to say, it had left me with enough answers about all questions of importance, leaving me with only a query which even if unanswered would not take the essence out of the movie. When the credits rolled in Inception, I knew in my heart that Christopher Nolan knew what actually happened. When the credits rolled in Cache, I doubted if I knew more than Haneke.

RATING :- 5.5 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Gone Girl Review (Spoiler Alert!)

 

I have watched Gone Girl twice now. Once as a thriller and once as a drama. Needless to say, it passed both the tests with flying colors. Gone Girl is not a movie for the faint-hearted, which should be palpable from the movies Fincher has given us the privilege of watching in the past (Se7en, The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, Zodiac). It is as much as a character study with the disintegration of a marriage as the stimulus and a complex criminal case.

Rosamund Pike is brilliant (or should I say amazing) in this movie, playing her character with a flair which I think can only be emulated by Carrie Ann-Moss. Ben Affleck is stupendous as Nick and so is Carrie Coon as his sister, Margo.

This movie is fabulous and here’s why :-

1.Representation of media :-

One of the main focus of the plot is on how media molds incorrect public opinions. The reason why it becomes impossible for Nick to get justice is because of the media’s shameful eagerness to ostracize and sham any individual for ratings. Many have criticized this movie as anti-feminist, however this very thought shows how correct this movie is. No one is talking about Nick getting wronged. It is a brilliant take on how on the surge of the noble feminist movement (which I wholly support), the media so as to cash in on anything of relevance, has begun masquerading as staunch feminists. I think it would have been okay even if within those fake masks they were hiding misandrist tendencies, but these assholes are in it just for the money and this finds an unabashed portrayal in Gone Girl.

2. Structure of the plot :-

David Fincher smacks us right on the face with his unreliable narrative. This is true film-making genius because the narrative remains the same, however the reliability of the narrator changes throughout the movie. The plot isn’t at all black-and-white, it’s all grey. All the characters are at fault here, yet in the end, Fincher makes us you still sympathize with one. THAT’S DIRECTING !

3.Rosamund Pike :-

Brilliant. Just wanted to say that again

4.Screenplay :-

Gone Girl is exactly the kind of script I would want on my table if I was a director. There are enough twists and turns to engage the audience for its run-time, and more than that, the intrigue stems off from the deceit and dual-nature of the characters, just like Game Of Thrones. It has some really funny one-liners, but what I found the most impressive is the fact that the writer exerted her control. Most of thrillers nowadays pick up on one fascinating thread and bind it with various unnecessary ones. In Gone Girl, the plot is compact, fast-paced and intelligent. The end of the movie is absolutely perfect, as if holding a mirror to realities of male-shaming by mislead misandrists and the frailties of modern marriages. And if you argue that this movie is anti-feminist, I have a pretty good case for Room being anti-meninist.

Gone Girl is a stupendous movie, which has enough twist and turns to engage you through the course of its run time and enough character revelations to engage you for your lifetime.

RATING :- 9. 3 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011549616628 YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Conversation Review

On the outer side, Francis Ford Coppola’s The Conversation looks like a nerve-wracking thriller, but the truth is, it is not about the plot as much as it is about the character. It is common to be mistaken by this fact and then be disappointed about this movie, because it creates an environment where it does actively pursue the plot. But all it is about is a character pursuing his innermost fears in an out-of-proportion blown morality crisis. The thrilling stuff is just the backdrop of it all.

The man at the center stage is Harry Caul, played by Gene Hackman, who is a professional surveillance expert. He maintains a neutral status about his line of work, for he believes that whatever the tapes he has recorded amount to, he has no responsibility.Until a case pops up where he develops a concern for the two individuals in question and things start going haywire.

Now when I say things start going haywire, it also, and mainly concerns his personal life. This is a character of so many layers and the movie explores the nature of his personality by using the moral crisis. The real mystery is not the plot, it is the character.

The plot on the other hand delves into the ethics of the world of surveillance. It attempts to open the doors of closed rooms  that we are so often thrilled and petrified of. And this is one of the few movies (Ace In The Hole is the only other one I recount) in which the theme explored holds relevance to the modern time rather than the one in which it was made and to more horror, I think instead of waning, this relevance is bound to enhance.

The movie encapsulates the master storytelling ability of Coppola with eerie silence used to generate paramount fear to best effect. Coppola transcends Hitchcock’s ability to explore obsessions, and let’s just say, that Palme D’Or was rightfully deserved.

The Conversation is one of the most engaging thrillers ever made, for it manages to create thrills out of the most inexplicable elements of cinema – emotions. And whether you like it or not, believe me, after watching this movie, there will be an irregular check of the sides of your telephone or the curtains. Just in case….

Rating : 9.2 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOOhttps://www.facebook.com/pages/Demanded-Critical-Reviews/1565666967024477?ref=hlYOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

Vertigo Review

Vertigo begins with a chase on the rooftops where an unfortunate incident makes the lead character John Ferguson (James Stewart) realize he has a fear of heights. The movie then cuts to a conversation between John and Midge Wood (Barbara Geddes) about quite a lot of things. The conversation is insightful, almost laying out the entire character sketches of these two characters in front of the audience.

Alfred Hitchcock is known as the master of suspense, and for quite solid reasons as well, his plots are intriguing, but his characters are more intriguing. ‘Vertigo’ works like a Greek tragedy, where doom befalls on all its characters. What is the movie about ? John Ferguson has retired from the force owing to his acrophobia. He is then hired by a colleague of his college times, Galvin Elster, to observe his wife Judy Barton who has been acting weird lately.

The tone of Vertigo is similar to all of Hitchcock’s previous works. The plot materializes in the first twenty minutes, and then, the bleak tone sets in. Hitchcock always was fascinated with the supernatural, never just believing in it. Vertigo and Psycho are similar in that way. Both have a supernatural plot line that progresses from the time things start getting awry and as much as Hitchcock loves exploring that tone, he brings us face to face with stark reality in the end.

I love how Hitchcock draws the lines here. Seemingly unrelated plot points converge at regular intervals. The master’s control over the craft is at its best here. The progression of the plot is similar to its main theme – OBSESSION. A plot begins, progresses, and comes back to its inception and demolishes itself paving a path for a new plot line. This is a story that goes back to back in loops. The  whole movie circles towards the same mysterious incident. In the beginning, it paves the path towards it and after it occurs, it brings us back to it repeatedly.

Stewart is brilliant here as Ferguson. The desperation is present on his face all along and produces a terrifying effect. Novak is unfortunately another pretty face lost in the intrigues of Hitchcock’s plot. Hitchcock, I think, would have been heavily criticized if he had been making movies now, with the cloud of feminism spreading all over the globe. Women are omnipresent in Hitchcock’s plot, but I don’t think he expects them to act, their only function is to look sexy. They provide the factor called ‘lust’ which is the driving force of all Hitchcockian plots. Men are obsessed with it and pursue it in his movies until it becomes the terrifying obsession due to which downfall befalls upon them. In fulfilling that purpose, Novak excels.

Vertigo is undoubtedly on of the most important movies ever made in the history of cinema. Every aspect of it was revolutionary. The costume design first of all ! The characters are as beautiful as they ever can be. And a lot of attention is given to these costumes for they are pivotal plot-turners as well.

Vertigo is one of the most beautiful movies ever made. Although most of the attention that Robert Burks’ cinematography received is attributed to the dolly zoom, what I find fascinating is the beautiful convergence of natural and artificial lighting in the forest sequences. Hitchcock always considered a cinema was successful only if it had an effect on all the senses of its viewer. The graphics are in terms with that and produce a disturbing effect as well. But the main attraction is the score by Bernard Herrmann, which is actually the prime factor which brings about a vertigo effect for the viewer, because it irritatingly goes back and back and back in loops, just like the plot of the movie which is all centered around a single incident.

But, in the end, like all greats do once or twice, Hitchcock errs. For the first time, Alfred Hitchcock displays sympathy towards his female characters. They materialize not just as a theme in the plot, but as actual characters. And as folly comes, he seems to be struck by the grief of Novak’s character ad devotes the end to understand her as a person. This move is what proves to be collateral for the whole movie. Imagine you are watching a Formula One race, with cars moving at 300 km/hr and faster and suddenly, they start moving at snail’s pace. That is the dampening effect that this move produces. A movie called Few Good Men also did the same mistake, although it still held itself high. It reveals the prime plot twist almost twenty minutes before the climax, and from there the plot becomes increasingly predictable. While A Few Good Men, saved itself due to its unforgettable dialogues in the last twenty minutes (all credits to Aaron Sorkin for that), Vertigo becomes an increasingly dull affair, second by second, until it reaches into a climax any dimwit can predict. And a glorious movie paves the way for its downfall. How horribly disappointing !

Vertigo is one of the most important movies ever made, and so is Citizen Kane. That doesn’t make them great movies. Vertigo’s downfall can be explained in a single word that also happens to be the main theme of the movie itself – OBSESSION. Hitchcock lusts for his own creation here, and as it is so realistically depicted in all of his works, isn’t lust the only thing that can cause the downfall of even the mightiest ?

Rating :- 8.1 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/pages/Demanded-Critical-Reviews/1565666967024477?ref=hl YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Se7en Review – David Fincher Series

David Fincher’s Se7en is about Detective William Somerset (Morgan Freeman) who is in the last days of his career. He is unsure about the new detective who has been brought in to replace him, Detective David Mills (Brad Pitt). But, Somerset is forced into reconsidering his retirement when he encounters his final case : a serial killer killing random people using Seven Deadly Sins as his modus operandi.

I am kickstarting my David Fincher series with my second favourite David Fincher movie, which is second only because it leaves you completely drained. If you are in for a David Fincher marathon, I would recommend watching Se7en the last. Se7en is a very tense psychological thriller. But fortunately, it never refrains from being a commercial fare. Brad Pitt is perfect in this movie. He really deserved a Best Supporting Actor nomination for his performance. Morgan Freeman deserved a Best Actor nomination for his role. Morgan Freeman is so subtle, so controlled in such chaos. And that is not a vice, for it is because of his time in the city.

The natural chemistry between Pitt and Freeman is the life of the movie. Pitt as the new rookie and Freeman as the experienced detective goes like bread and butter in this case. Se7en, along with The Silence of the Lambs, are the only movies I think that qualify both as a thriller and horror in equal proportions. When you are watching Se7en, you will be literally chewing your fingers because the nails will be on the floor once you see that Victor scene.

The dialogues of Se7en are one of the best is cinema. The way it keeps you engaged ! You may expect a cat and mouse chase throughout the movie when you begin with Se7en, but it gradually transcends into a moody, dull, chilling and deeply disturbing Before Sunrise. The movie constitutes of conversations between Pitt, Morgan and Paltrow in its running time and the conversations are witty and philosophical. We see the sort of father-son relationship of Pitt and Freeman coming into inception within these conversations. The initial rivalry between Pitt and Morgan’s characters develops into a father son relationship. This is well apparent when Somerset is about to call Mills a ‘son-of-a-bitch’ but stops at ‘son-of-a..’ because he has begun considering himself his father. A father who cares deeply about his son and won’t let any harm befall on him.

Se7en is a deeply philosophical and stark realistic movie as well. The city where these events are set into motion is the most horrible place on Earth. It never stops raining there. Se7en is shot very intelligently. Fincher lets us hear the crowds shouting at night and disturbing Somerset’s sleep. We are given grim words and some scenes of the city where we are given glimpses of the horror unleashed. It is the evil of the world put into a single place, which also happens to be the place where our protagonists resides. There is a saying ‘One rotten tomatoes in a basket spoil all the good ones’. That is what has happened here as well. Our serial killer is actually a good individual who is driven to the point of insanity by the evil happening around him and himself turns to the evil when he decides to take a stand against the evil. It is about the thin line existing between good and evil and about the individuals caught in the middle and also puts forth a question ‘Who decides what is evil ? ‘

The cinematography is in tone with the flick. There is a visually arresting scene in a library where Morgan Freeman is standing with green study lamps all around him. The scenes in the city are darkly lit signifying the evil prevailing in the city while the scenes where our protagonists receive clues and the scenes in the library are well lit, signifying that knowledge is the only factor which can lead a horrendous society to goodness.

The score by Howard Shore is mortifying and is a proof that he can adjust to every genre, and is as good as his score of Lord Of The Rings. There are many people who said the ending sucks. Well, they didn’t muster up enough concentration while watching Se7en because in a scene Somerset warns Mills about the case beforehand by saying ‘You know, this case is not going to have a happy ending.

Se7en is a thrilling and dark venture into the world of psychological thrillers and has superb performances, a brilliant script and stupendous cinematography and a nerve-wracking score, and is a benchmark in its genre and is one of David Fincher’s greatest works.

 Rating : 9.4 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. YOU CAN ALSO REQUEST A REVIEW OF A MOVIE OR SITCOM IN THE COMMENTS BELOW. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOOhttps://www.facebook.com/pages/Demanded-Critical-Reviews/1565666967024477?ref=hlYOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

Unbreakable Review

M.Night Shyamalan’s Unbreakable is about David Dunn (Bruce Willis) who is the sole survivour of a train wreck. But the fascinating fact is he has escaped without even a single scratch. This draws the attention of the media as well as Elijah Prince (Samuel.L.Jackson) a comic book collector suffering from Osteogenesis Imperfecta, who offers David a bizarre explanation about this incident – that he is a superhero.

Unbreakable beings with a thrilling scene showing Elijah’s birth. That scene was so visually confusing that it garners attention from the audience and reminds them to pay attention, for the devil is in the details, and the audience does because The Sixth Sense was still fresh in everyone’s minds. The cinematography by Eduardo Serra is just like Micheal Chapman’s in Scorsese’s Taxi Driver. Never has the mirror paradox being used so effectively since Taxi Driver. Next, we are pulled into present time where David is sitting in the train. This scene is so brilliant. Everything about the hero is revealed : he has a fear of water, marital problems, likes sports. That shot is how a character study should be. And the reactions of the audiences about David is captured using the expressions of a 5-year old girl. The movies has very long shots and I think actors deserved Oscar nominations for their roles because in many movies it is one shot, cut, other shot, cut and so on. But, to keep up the act for such a long time is prodigious.

Unbreakable is a slow paced thriller. It takes a lot of time to come into shape, but is very enjoyable. Bruce Willis is superb in this role, waning off all his melodrama he gives a subtle, effective performance and so does Samuel.L.Jackson. He puts his Pulp Fiction and Jungle Fever to a side and gives us a heartbreaking performance.

James Newton Howard’s score is superb. Just.. superb !

Unbreakable actually has some lines similar to Fight Club. No, these movies are poles apart with respect to their content, but it has a similar ideology : do what you want to do or you won’t be happy. There is a scene in Fight Club where Tyler threatens a man with a gun and orders him to follow his dreams. David is similar. He is unhappy because he shouldn’t be a security guard at a football stadium, instead he should be goddamn superhero.

Why people initially had second thoughts about this movie is that people just compared it to The Sixth Sense. Folks, The Sixth Sense is one of the greatest movies ever made. Stop comparing this to The Sixth Sense. Unbreakable is a whole different movie. You don’t compare Schindler’s List, Jaws and The Terminal, do you ? No, because they are whole different movies. Each is a classic, in their own right. The twist seemed illogical to me as well, but the way Shyamalan presents it is noteworthy. See in The Sixth Sense, the twist was given some time to sink in. Unbreakable’s twist is depressing in nature and also is so short that the impact is of a very high magnitude.

Unbreakable is a superbly acted, thrilling work by Shyamalan and while it does have its share of vices, the concept is innovative and is surprisingly fresh considering the time of its release.

Rating : 8 / 10

THANKS FOR READING. IF YOU HAVE LIKED/HAVE DIFFERENT VIEWS / HAVE ANY  DOUBTS, PLEASE SHARE. YOU CAN ALSO REQUEST A REVIEW OF A MOVIE OR SITCOM IN THE COMMENTS BELOW. I WILL RESPOND TO IT AS SOON AS I CAN. AND PLEASE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE. YOU CAN FOLLOW ME ON MY FACEBOOK PAGE TOO https://www.facebook.com/pages/Demanded-Critical-Reviews/1565666967024477?ref=hl YOU CAN ALSO E-MAIL ME ON castlebang786@gmail.com OR favebook2011@rediffmail.com

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Copyright : All written content on this site, unless otherwise noted, has been created by the website owner. As such, the content is the property of the website owner. This content is protected by Indian and international copyright laws. If you wish to reproduce, re-post, or display any of our content on your own site please only do so if you also provide a link back to the source page on this website and properly attribute authorship. Our preference is that you seek our permission before doing so. If you see anything on this website that has not been properly attributed to its originator please contact me. In response, I will attempt to correct the attribution of the offending material or remove and/or replace it. All material on this website is posted in accordance with the limitations set forward by the Information Technology Act, 2000. If a documented copyright owner so requests, their material will be removed from published display, although the author reserves the right to provide linkage to that material or to a source for that material. As a website devoted to discussing and reviewing movies and television I will at times, for illustrative purposes, present copyrighted material, the use of which might not always be specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available  for purposes such as criticism, comment, and research. The website owner believes that this constitutes a “fair use” of any such copyrighted material because the articles published on this website are distributed for entertainment purposes.

An In-Depth Analysis Of Whiplash ( Spoiler Alert !)

If you read my reviews, you may know about my love for the critically-acclaimed 2014 movie ‘Whiplash‘. Since I live in India, I got to see Whiplash in 2015 after its Oscar glory gave it much required publicity. I lamented on the fact that I got to see this only in 2015 when the whole world had seen and was raving about in 2014. Whiplash was on everybody’s 2014 top 10 movies list, including that of my favourite film critic Chris Stuckmann’s list, in which ended up on the No.2 position. But since I saw it in 2015, I will definitely include it in my 2015 list in which it will most probably get the first position.

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Why ? Because Whiplash, in my opinion is one of the greatest films ever made. If you have checked the  ‘About Me’ feature on my blog, you may have noticed that Whiplash is fifth on my list of the Top 10 Greatest Films Ever Made, and if you haven’t, here’s the link : https://demandedcriticalreviews.wordpress.com/about/ . Now, you may say that I am exaggerating. That I am just a stupid teenager who doesn’t know crap about movies and will include any good movie that he has seen to his ‘Great Movies’ list. With all respect, I am not.

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This is a great movie, from the start to the end. This a movie that people are gonna look 25 years from now and say ‘That is a classic’. This will be on every ‘Great Movies’ list. Damien Chazelle will probably be where Quentin Tarantino is right now. (or where Shyamalan is right now, let’s hope that not happens). This will be helmed as one of the greatest independent features ever made. Reservoir Dogs is considered as ‘The Greatest Independent Film Of All Time’. But, that is the position that Whiplash will occupy after 25 years. And fortunately, I seem to sense it now. That’s why it occupies that position on my list.

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So today, my best friend payed me an unexpected visit to celebrate the first price I acquired in my extempore competition, and since I had nothing to entertain him or me, I turned to Whiplash, the movie that I never get tired of watching. After watching the movie, I looked up my review of  Whiplash, which also happens to be the first movie I reviewed as well. I am sure that many of you will find it very juvenile in its nature, so read it only if you haven’t watched the movie. https://demandedcriticalreviews.wordpress.com/2015/04/07/whiplash-review/

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So, a short prep. Whiplash is about Andrew Neiman, a jazz drummer who wants to become one of the greats. And when he is selected for a studio band, he thinks it is his first step towards greatness. But it may well become the last step as well if he doesn’t hold up against the psychological torture by the band’s curator, Terence Fletcher.

This film obviously deserves a second viewing, but I gave it its ninth viewing yesterday and I found many elements hidden deep within this movie. So let’s get started :-

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First of all, you may wonder why Andrew was selected. Throughout the film, one thing is apparent, Fletcher wants complete control. That’s why I think he avoids socializing and all that. He has a created a little world for himself where he is the God, where he can impose control over people. He tests his control everyday. When he enters the class, everybody has to stand up. When he moves those fingers and gives those signals, everyone has to start at the right time. That’s what attracted him to Andrew, because in their first encounter Andrew doesn’t listen to him. Nor does he stand up when Fletcher enters the room. He even begins drumming without Fletcher’s cues. He was selected just to grill him and mould him into one of his subjects.

I too in my post regarding the nominees and winners of Oscars 2015 (https://demandedcriticalreviews.wordpress.com/2015/03/22/oscars-2015/) criticized the Academy for giving the Oscar for Best Editing to Tom Cross for Whiplash instead of Sandra Adair for Boyhood. I sill stand-by that statement, Sandra Adair just proves why she is my favourite editor in Hollywood with that movie. But, I can now clearly see why the Academy might have come to their conclusion about this category.

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There is a scene in which Fletcher auditions Andrew, Ryan and Tanner for a rigorous 10 hours. So, the general perception we concur from that scene is that the audition lasted for only one hour because our only reliable source of time in those scenes were the occasional shots of the clock. But, Tom Cross put in an extra scene, a completely unrelated scene in the flick with an exterior view of the exit of the Conservatory to show that it was night. Sheer brilliance !

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Now, the first thing that I think attracted Fletcher towards Neiman is that he is a lot like him. Take into consideration the restaurant sequence of Andrew and Nicole. Andrew grills her, in a controlled way, and enforces a superiority complex in their relationship. He wants dominance because he ain’t got nothing from his family which constantly downplays his drumming. He forces Nicole to blurt out the truth that she chose her university just because it was the only one that let her in, while he chose his because it was the best music school in the country. Also, Andrew too considers everyone else lower than him. The standing testimony is when Ryan is given Andrew’s part, and he just vents his anger and calls him Johny Utah while in the next shot, Fletcher too calls him as Johny Utah.

And the ending ! Forget the drum solo, look at the meaning. It gave me a chill when I understood it in its entirety. Fletcher wins ! Now you are like ‘What the fuck is this guy talking about ? That asshole was drummed up his ass by Miles Teller !’ No, he wasn’t. Fletcher never had the potential to be great. But, in his conscious he was already great, he just wanted the world to admit it as well. Since he couldn’t prove this as a pianist, Fletcher employs another method – to be a kingmaker. That is the whole point of the ‘Bird’ story. As you may remember, early into the movie, Fletcher narrates to Andrew a story about how Charlie Parker became the Bird only after Jo Jones threw a cymbal at his head.

That’s what happened here as well. He made Andrew defeat him. He made Andrew great. He escalated Andrew to the position of Charlie Parker, which in turn, escalated him to the position of Jo Jones. He created such a scenario that wherever Andrew’s name will be taken, he will also be remembered.

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That’s what that smile was about. Both, Andrew as well as Fletcher acknowledged the actual truth. It was a paradigm shift in both their roles. But don’t be sad because Fletcher wins, because in a way Andrew too wins the bout.

I don’t know if what all I said is right or wrong, but there is one thing I know for sure and that is the fact that Whiplash is one of the best movies of the decade, and I would say one of the greatest movies ever made. It is an incendiary masterpiece, which I foretell that people, after 25 years will shout and say, ‘ That was THE MOVIE ! ‘

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